September182014

So every year the new Panini Golden Age card set comes out…

I have to immediately scour the online checklist for an racehorse cards (which are always included)

My dad got an empty PGA box today at his card store. Every box has a box topper card and box bottom cards, and there are a few different ones. The one he rescued from being thrown out had one baseball player, one football player, and…one Gallant Fox! 

But then he told me he’s keeping it for the collection 

So anyways, I will be slowly collecting the other cards in the set over the coming weeks. Trying to get the Gallant Fox topper, as well as the Whirlaway/Citation/Eddie Arcaro topper, and the Man o’ War, Alydar, Assault, Spectacular Bid, and Northern Dancer cards.

WISH ME LUCK MY MINIONS 

1PM

webuiltthepyramids replied to your photo:Favorite Racehorse Pictures 1/∞  If you don’t…

I am laughing so hard. My professor asked if there was something I’d like to share with the rest of the class and oh the look of horror that must have come over my face.

"Why, yes, professor, I would like to share. Everyone take a look at this magnificent example of 1930’s photobombing and appreciate it. Also it sorta looks like a pony-boney."

1PM

Favorite Racehorse Pictures 1/∞

 If you don’t immediately get why this is one of my favorites, congrats on being less of a pervert than me! (Note: there is no prize for this)
Anyways, this combination of random background passer-by and awesome timing makes 1936 Horse of the Year Granville seem really, really excited about having won the Saratoga Cup. And it looks like jockey Jimmy Stout up there has noticed. So has the guy holding the horse. 
So basically, faux post-race victory boner. 

Favorite Racehorse Pictures 1/

 If you don’t immediately get why this is one of my favorites, congrats on being less of a pervert than me! (Note: there is no prize for this)

Anyways, this combination of random background passer-by and awesome timing makes 1936 Horse of the Year Granville seem really, really excited about having won the Saratoga Cup. And it looks like jockey Jimmy Stout up there has noticed. So has the guy holding the horse. 

So basically, faux post-race victory boner. 

September132014
1PM

horsesfuckyeah:

Black Caviar and her newborn Exceed and Excel filly

[X]

She’s so fucking cute!!!

1PM

railraptor:

Black Caviar becomes a mum

Video of the special event :)

*Flailing forever*

(Source: youtube.com)

September112014
"A well-authenticated bitch"
Jane Gail was, first and foremost, the maiden name of radio commentator Edwin C. Hill’s wife. It was also the name of a chestnut daughter of *Blenheim II, foaled at Calumet Farm in early 1944. Her dam had been a hard-working and honest mare named Lady Higloss, but without a doubt Jane Gail took after her sire. She was, in polite company, simply “crazy”. But her trainer, Jimmy Jones, was much more blunt when he described her as “a well-authenticated bitch”. In any event, Jane Gail was not much of a racer, which may have had to do with her unpredictable nature. She raced at 2 and 3, and won a credible 4 of her 8 starts, though none of them were stakes. She was retired at the end of 1947, sent back to Calumet, and duly mated to the farm’s prized stallion, Bull Lea. From that mating came a finely-formed bay colt that the farm originally intended to be called Gail Hill (a continuation, as it were, of his dam’s name). The Jockey Club objected to the name on the grounds that it “sounded more like a name for a filly”. Calumet settled for reversing it, and the colt hit the track in 1951 under the name Hill Gail. Today, Hill Gail is chiefly remembered for winning the 1952 Kentucky Derby, but he also took the Santa Anita Derby and San Vicente Stakes, and set or equaled two track records (in the Phoenix Handicap and Derby Trial)Jane Gail was sent to imported British stallion *Alibhai for her second mating, and produced a filly named Jana. This filly, like her mother, was unsuccessful on the track. She was sold to W.W. Naylor, and sold again to Mrs. M. E. Lunn in 1955, with her filly Princess Jana by her side. Jana produced only two fillies before fading into obscurityJane Gail’s final foal was Hardwicke, a full brother of Hill Gail. He was still nursing when his 8-year-old mother died of unknown causes. She lived long enough to see her fist son win the Kentucky Derby, dying on May 30, 1952(Photo by J.C. Meadors)

"A well-authenticated bitch"

Jane Gail was, first and foremost, the maiden name of radio commentator Edwin C. Hill’s wife. It was also the name of a chestnut daughter of *Blenheim II, foaled at Calumet Farm in early 1944. Her dam had been a hard-working and honest mare named Lady Higloss, but without a doubt Jane Gail took after her sire. She was, in polite company, simply “crazy”. But her trainer, Jimmy Jones, was much more blunt when he described her as “a well-authenticated bitch”. 

In any event, Jane Gail was not much of a racer, which may have had to do with her unpredictable nature. She raced at 2 and 3, and won a credible 4 of her 8 starts, though none of them were stakes. 

She was retired at the end of 1947, sent back to Calumet, and duly mated to the farm’s prized stallion, Bull Lea. From that mating came a finely-formed bay colt that the farm originally intended to be called Gail Hill (a continuation, as it were, of his dam’s name). The Jockey Club objected to the name on the grounds that it “sounded more like a name for a filly”. Calumet settled for reversing it, and the colt hit the track in 1951 under the name Hill Gail. Today, Hill Gail is chiefly remembered for winning the 1952 Kentucky Derby, but he also took the Santa Anita Derby and San Vicente Stakes, and set or equaled two track records (in the Phoenix Handicap and Derby Trial)

Jane Gail was sent to imported British stallion *Alibhai for her second mating, and produced a filly named Jana. This filly, like her mother, was unsuccessful on the track. She was sold to W.W. Naylor, and sold again to Mrs. M. E. Lunn in 1955, with her filly Princess Jana by her side. Jana produced only two fillies before fading into obscurity

Jane Gail’s final foal was Hardwicke, a full brother of Hill Gail. He was still nursing when his 8-year-old mother died of unknown causes. She lived long enough to see her fist son win the Kentucky Derby, dying on May 30, 1952

(Photo by J.C. Meadors)
5PM
2PM
September82014
Hedevar"In a racing career which included 54 starts, he won 19 races from a distance of 6 furlongs to 1 1/16 miles, retiring as a sound horse after four years of campaigning with earnings of $164,294. Hedevar made his mark in the racing world when he equaled the world record of 1:33.1 for a mile in the Equipoise Mile Handicap, the new record presently being held by the great Dr. Fager. In addition to his record win in the Equipoise Mile, Hedevar also finished second in the Metropolitan Handicap, the Arlington Handicap, and others. Hedevar is by Count of Honor - Creme Brulee, by Double Jay. Hedevar’s second dam, *Desert Sun II by Hyperion, is the dam of Desert Way and Desert Vision (dam of Desert Law, over $88,000, and Desert Love, $169,200). Hedevar’s third dam is Brulette, one of the great classic race mares in French racing history.”Hedevar was also known as the infamous rabbit stablemate of 1967 Horse of the Year Damascus. He set blazing early paces in the ‘67 Woodward Stakes, the “Race of the Century”, which helped tire out front running Dr. FagerAt stud, Hedevar was best represented by 1976 Spiral Stakes winner and Kentucky Derby starter Inca Roca(Quote and photo from stud advertisement in December 1970 issue of Horseman’s Journal)

Hedevar

"In a racing career which included 54 starts, he won 19 races from a distance of 6 furlongs to 1 1/16 miles, retiring as a sound horse after four years of campaigning with earnings of $164,294. Hedevar made his mark in the racing world when he equaled the world record of 1:33.1 for a mile in the Equipoise Mile Handicap, the new record presently being held by the great Dr. Fager

In addition to his record win in the Equipoise Mile, Hedevar also finished second in the Metropolitan Handicap, the Arlington Handicap, and others. 

Hedevar is by Count of Honor - Creme Brulee, by Double Jay. Hedevar’s second dam, *Desert Sun II by Hyperion, is the dam of Desert Way and Desert Vision (dam of Desert Law, over $88,000, and Desert Love, $169,200). Hedevar’s third dam is Brulette, one of the great classic race mares in French racing history.”

Hedevar was also known as the infamous rabbit stablemate of 1967 Horse of the Year Damascus. He set blazing early paces in the ‘67 Woodward Stakes, the “Race of the Century”, which helped tire out front running Dr. Fager

At stud, Hedevar was best represented by 1976 Spiral Stakes winner and Kentucky Derby starter Inca Roca

(Quote and photo from stud advertisement in December 1970 issue of Horseman’s Journal)

9PM

illogicalrabbit said: Hey, I noticed that in the "break like quail" post, one of the horses seems to have blinkers that cover his entire eye (he's the one in the blue) as opposed to just being a cup. What's the purpose of that design?

Pacifiers!

I just love the look of pacifiers. Make every horse look like a weird, bug-eyed alien. I mean, really:

image

That is hilarious. 

So anyways, pacifiers are a bit of mesh they put over blinker cups to fully cover the eye. They both protect from flying debris, and serve to “pacify” excitable horses by restricting their vision (though they are not to be used in muddy conditions, as they are more likely to clog up from flying mud)

Check ‘em out here

September72014
10-year-old British-bred mare Gray Rocket poses with her daughter Grey Ruffle, born in 1960

10-year-old British-bred mare Gray Rocket poses with her daughter Grey Ruffle, born in 1960

12PM
1894 Epsom Derby winner Ladas II poses with his connections. Far left is his owner, Lord Rosebery, who became Prime Minister the year his horse won the Derby. Next is trainer Mathew Dawson, and riding is jockey John “Jack” Watts 
Ladas II was undefeated in four starts as a juvenile, but he won the first three while still unnamed. Known as “The Illuminata Colt” after his dam, he won the Woodcote, Coventry, and Champagne Stakes before “Lord Rosebery bestowed on the colt the name of Ladas”. With that name, he took both the Epsom Derby and Two Thousand Guineas Stakes in 1894

1894 Epsom Derby winner Ladas II poses with his connections. Far left is his owner, Lord Rosebery, who became Prime Minister the year his horse won the Derby. Next is trainer Mathew Dawson, and riding is jockey John “Jack” Watts 

Ladas II was undefeated in four starts as a juvenile, but he won the first three while still unnamed. Known as “The Illuminata Colt” after his dam, he won the Woodcote, Coventry, and Champagne Stakes before “Lord Rosebery bestowed on the colt the name of Ladas”. With that name, he took both the Epsom Derby and Two Thousand Guineas Stakes in 1894

September22014
Lestor Piggott and champion miler Royal Academy, winners of the 1990 Breeder’s Cup Mile at Belmont Park 

Lestor Piggott and champion miler Royal Academy, winners of the 1990 Breeder’s Cup Mile at Belmont Park 

5PM
“We’ll miss you, even when you say things like “Johnny Velasquez dropped the whip at the sixteenth pole!” letting everyone know of my mistake.” John Velasques, at Tom Durkin’s retirement ceremony. (via webuiltthepyramids)

(via myfatherisalumberjack)

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