July192014

“Busher had one of the most beautiful and intelligent heads seen on any thoroughbred. Her eye held and expression of awareness that was characteristic of her grand sire, Man o’ War.”
-Racing historian and illustrator C. W. Anderson

Busher had one of the most beautiful and intelligent heads seen on any thoroughbred. Her eye held and expression of awareness that was characteristic of her grand sire, Man o’ War.”

-Racing historian and illustrator C. W. Anderson

7PM
Champion French mare Urban Sea (left), winning the 1993 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe by a neck from Derby Italiano winner White Muzzle 
As great of a racehorse as she was, Urban Sea was possibly even better as a broodmare. Prior to her death in 2009, she produced two legends of the sport, in addition to six other stakes winners. Urban Sea is one of only two mares ever to produced two Epsom Derby winners; 2001 winner and exceptional sire Galileo, and 2009 winner and Horse of the Year Sea the Stars. Beyond these two, she was also the dam of 1999 Irish Champion 3-Year-Old colt Urban Ocean, multiple stakes winning mare My Typhoon, 2002 Italian Champion 3-Year-Old Colt Black Sam Bellamy, 2011 Blenheim Stakes winner Born to Sea, Group 3 Middleton Stakes winner All Too Beautiful, and Pretty Polly Stakes winner Melikah 

Champion French mare Urban Sea (left), winning the 1993 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe by a neck from Derby Italiano winner White Muzzle 

As great of a racehorse as she was, Urban Sea was possibly even better as a broodmare. Prior to her death in 2009, she produced two legends of the sport, in addition to six other stakes winners. Urban Sea is one of only two mares ever to produced two Epsom Derby winners; 2001 winner and exceptional sire Galileo, and 2009 winner and Horse of the Year Sea the Stars. Beyond these two, she was also the dam of 1999 Irish Champion 3-Year-Old colt Urban Ocean, multiple stakes winning mare My Typhoon, 2002 Italian Champion 3-Year-Old Colt Black Sam Bellamy, 2011 Blenheim Stakes winner Born to Sea, Group 3 Middleton Stakes winner All Too Beautiful, and Pretty Polly Stakes winner Melikah 

July152014
Stablemates Hill Prince (left) and Bryan G, strolling at Belmont Park in 1951
Hill Prince, the previous year’s Preakness Stakes winner and Horse of the Year, had broken a bone in his right hind leg while training in January 1951. In his absence, Bryan G became the star of Meadow Stable, winning the Pimlico Special, Aqueduct Handicap, and Westchester Handicap

Stablemates Hill Prince (left) and Bryan G, strolling at Belmont Park in 1951

Hill Prince, the previous year’s Preakness Stakes winner and Horse of the Year, had broken a bone in his right hind leg while training in January 1951. In his absence, Bryan G became the star of Meadow Stable, winning the Pimlico Special, Aqueduct Handicap, and Westchester Handicap

July142014
“…and now the field approaching the top of the stretch. Giacomo on the outside is the leader as the field turns for home, but here comes the Preakness winner - Afleet Alex - on his outside! And Southern Africa battles on at the rail - AND AFLEET ALEX JUST RAN RIGHT BY GIACOMO LIKE HE WAS STANDING STILL! Afleet Alex opening up with a tremendous burst of energy! He’s five lengths clear at the eighth pole! Andromeda’s Hero has now moved into second, Southern Africa third, Giacomo has faded, Nolan’s Cat…a compelling, outstanding performance by the plucky Afleet Alex. He won by six or seven lengths.”

Stretch call of 2005 Belmont Stakes. (x)

(Source: webuiltthepyramids)

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racinglegends:

Happy, happy, and long retirement to The Fugue, and speedy recovery.
She sustained an injury during the Coral-Eclipse Stakes, in which she finished sixth. (July 2014)Read more here.
"Unfortunately The Fugue sustained an injury to her near-fore in the Eclipse Stakes. (…) Having discussed the matter with Andrew and Madeleine Lloyd-Webber, we have taken the decision, in the best interests of the filly, to retire her from racing." said her trainer, John Gosden. 
Photo: X

racinglegends:

Happy, happy, and long retirement to The Fugue, and speedy recovery.

She sustained an injury during the Coral-Eclipse Stakes, in which she finished sixth. (July 2014)
Read more here.

"Unfortunately The Fugue sustained an injury to her near-fore in the Eclipse Stakes. (…) Having discussed the matter with Andrew and Madeleine Lloyd-Webber, we have taken the decision, in the best interests of the filly, to retire her from racing." said her trainer, John Gosden. 

Photo: X

July132014

horsesornothing said: Gosh Megan, what kind of shenanigans are you starting now, with your personal opinions and whatnot

I’M JUST TRYIN TA LIVE MAH LIFE AND RUN MAH BLOG 

I’M A STRONG INDEPENDENT BLOGGER AND I DON’T NEED NO ANONS

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webuiltthepyramids said: Anyone who messages Megan and tells her she's rude for acknowledging a horse's ability and potential but saying she personally doesn't wuv him can come at me and see what happens.

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5PM

cherryxdreams said: What do you think of California Chrome? A friend of Mine is a huge fan of him:-) Such a beauty.

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How to answer this? Hmmm…too direct and I get a hundred messages about how “rude” I am, but at the same time I really can’t lie about it…

I think…if the horse had better/more sensible/not such asshat owners, he has the possibility to be one of the best of the decade. I personally am not a fan, nor could I ever conceive of being one while he’s under their management. But as to the horse himself, he has the ability. I just don’t think it will ever be fully utilized, due to the aforementioned asshatery of his owners 

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"The Little Princess"
She was beautiful, she was well-bred, and she was undeniably fast. In 1951, the ranks of the juvenile fillies were dominated by a nearly invincible force of nature known as Princess Lygia 
Princess Lygia was born royalty, not the least because of her parents. Her sire was stakes winner Roman, and though most of his best offspring were yet to come, he had already been represented earlier winners I Will and Cosmic Missile. She was out of a mare called Roman Matron, also the dam of Maryland Futurity winner Tuscany. Roman Matron was herself a daughter of champion juvenile colt Pompey, and her distaff side traced back to Broomstick and Peter Pan. Continuing the Roman theme, Princess Lygia was named after the fictional princess in Henryk Sienkiewicz’s 1895 novel “Quo Vadis”, who was condemned to die by Roman Emperor Nero for her Christian faith. 
A small-ish, finely boned bay, Princess Lygia was sold as a yearling for $3,600 to Core Mae Trotsek. Her training was undertaken by Trotsek’s husband, Hall of Fame trainer Harry Trotsek. It was with these connections that The Princess achieved her greatest success. She made her racing debut at the Lincoln Fields meeting at Washinton Park, and won easily by eight lengths. On June 10, 1951, she made her stakes debut, beating 11 rivals to take the Miss America Stakes, leading all the way through the five furlongs. 
A scarce month later, she was at Arlington Park for the Hyde Park Stakes, that year run in two divisions. The first part saw Washington Park Futurity winner Oh Leo posting a surprise victory, while the second featured Princess Lygia running away with it by seven lengths as the favorite. The Pollyanna Stakes was run only a week later, and again The Princess was untroubled in her victory. Jockey Kenny Church guided her to a three-length score over future Milady Handicap winner Flitting Past.
Her fifth straight victory, and her fourth stakes score, came in the $56,715 Arlington Lassie Stakes on July 19. Breaking on top and staying there, The Princess won by 3 1/2 lengths from Hadnt Orter. She was now considered the champion juvenile filly of the year, and had in fact already earned more than any other juvenile, male or female, during that season
Now undefeated in five starts and outearning her competition, Princess Lygia was a highly promising prospect. Movie mogul Louis B Mayer, who had paid $50,000 for Busher in the dawn of her spectacular three-year-old season, was looking for another champion filly. In early August 1951, The Princess was sold for a staggering $100,000 to Mayer, who immediately entered her in the Princess Pat Stakes at Washington Park, less than a week away. Nobody, least of all Mayer, could have predicted how her season would end.
Carrying Mayer’s silk for the first time, Princess Lygia met her first defeat. A Gleam, the first daughter of Busher’s contemporary, Twilight Tear, posted an upset victory, winning by six lengths.
Whether she was injured, or simply fell off her training, Princess Lygia was retired for the year following the Princess Pat Stakes. Furthermore, she lost out on the Champion Juvenile Filly title to Matron and Selima Stakes winner Rose Jet
Unfortunately, The Princess never regained her juvenile form. At three, she won only one big race, but she was close in several others. Her first major engagement of the year was the $22,700 Sea Breeze Stakes at Hollywood Park in mid-May 1952. She was beaten a head by Tonga, though she did manage to outfinish old rival A Gleam.
Encouraged by her near miss, Mayer next pointed The Princess at the Hollywood Oaks, run in the first week of June. The top three finishers of the Sea Breeze were back, and this time the finish was reversed; A Gleam “finished full of run”, while Princess Lygia “could not handle the stretch drive” of her rival. Tonga, outrun early, drove on to finish third. 
It was next on to Debonair Stakes in mid-June, and once again The Princess lost to her rival A Gleam, who skipped to a three length score. Princess Lygia lost ground in the stretch and was overtaken by the gelding Stranglehold for second. 
The Princess had a chance to step out from the shadow of A Gleam in the Ramona Handicap on July 5, but she was instead overshadowed by another champion mare. Two Lea, then in the midst of a triumphant return to racing after being sidelined by ringbone, “laid back in last place in the field”, before surging to the front with a determined finish. The Princess ended up in a dead heat for second with the older mare Ruth Lily.
Princess Lygia had once last big win in her, and this came in the Misty Isle Stakes at Arlington in late August. Almost exactly one year and a month after her last stakes victory, in the Arlington Lassie, the former undefeated champion made a triumphant return to the winner’s circle. She carried 122 pounds and was the favorite in the the field. Her only real competition seemed to be British-bred *Papoose, a daughter of champion juvenile colt Menow. In the end, Princess Lygia galloped to a four length victory, with Papoose finishing third. 
A week later came her last race. In the Sheridan Handicap at Washington Park, she was beaten by future Hawthorne Gold Cup winner Sub Fleet, piloted by Eddie Arcaro. It was close at the end, though. The Princess never gave up and Sub Fleet had to run “the fastest mile of the Chicago season” to beat her.
The Princess was a fine, if not particularly distinguished, broodmare. She was first mated in 1954, at age 5, and her first stallion was British import *Royal Charger, still in his first few years of stud in the US. The result was the filly Royal Lygia, undistinguished as both racer and broodmare.
She was given two years off before being sent back to *Royal Charger. This time the foal was colt, Prince Charger, who was stakes-placed and earned over $30,000. In 1958, she was matched with a cheap *Alibhai stallion named Quick Wink, the result of which was the colt Prince of Plenty. He was perhaps her most successful racer, winning one division of the Will Rogers Stakes and placing in both the Debonair Stakes and Bay District Handicap 
A few years later, in 1963, she was sent to Hollywood Gold Cup winner Prince Blessed, and from that produced the filly Maskette (not to be confused with the two-time champion filly of the early 20th century), who won only one race and produced even less at stud
Princess Lygia’s final foal, the filly Fleet Lygia, was her only one who left a mark at stud. Both of Fleet Lygia’s sons were stakes runners, and her older son Feisty Fighter won the 1979 Tenacious Handicap 

"The Little Princess"

She was beautiful, she was well-bred, and she was undeniably fast. In 1951, the ranks of the juvenile fillies were dominated by a nearly invincible force of nature known as Princess Lygia 

Princess Lygia was born royalty, not the least because of her parents. Her sire was stakes winner Roman, and though most of his best offspring were yet to come, he had already been represented earlier winners I Will and Cosmic Missile. She was out of a mare called Roman Matron, also the dam of Maryland Futurity winner Tuscany. Roman Matron was herself a daughter of champion juvenile colt Pompey, and her distaff side traced back to Broomstick and Peter Pan. Continuing the Roman theme, Princess Lygia was named after the fictional princess in Henryk Sienkiewicz’s 1895 novel “Quo Vadis”, who was condemned to die by Roman Emperor Nero for her Christian faith. 

A small-ish, finely boned bay, Princess Lygia was sold as a yearling for $3,600 to Core Mae Trotsek. Her training was undertaken by Trotsek’s husband, Hall of Fame trainer Harry Trotsek. It was with these connections that The Princess achieved her greatest success. She made her racing debut at the Lincoln Fields meeting at Washinton Park, and won easily by eight lengths. On June 10, 1951, she made her stakes debut, beating 11 rivals to take the Miss America Stakes, leading all the way through the five furlongs. 

A scarce month later, she was at Arlington Park for the Hyde Park Stakes, that year run in two divisions. The first part saw Washington Park Futurity winner Oh Leo posting a surprise victory, while the second featured Princess Lygia running away with it by seven lengths as the favorite. The Pollyanna Stakes was run only a week later, and again The Princess was untroubled in her victory. Jockey Kenny Church guided her to a three-length score over future Milady Handicap winner Flitting Past.

Her fifth straight victory, and her fourth stakes score, came in the $56,715 Arlington Lassie Stakes on July 19. Breaking on top and staying there, The Princess won by 3 1/2 lengths from Hadnt Orter. She was now considered the champion juvenile filly of the year, and had in fact already earned more than any other juvenile, male or female, during that season

Now undefeated in five starts and outearning her competition, Princess Lygia was a highly promising prospect. Movie mogul Louis B Mayer, who had paid $50,000 for Busher in the dawn of her spectacular three-year-old season, was looking for another champion filly. In early August 1951, The Princess was sold for a staggering $100,000 to Mayer, who immediately entered her in the Princess Pat Stakes at Washington Park, less than a week away. Nobody, least of all Mayer, could have predicted how her season would end.

Carrying Mayer’s silk for the first time, Princess Lygia met her first defeat. A Gleam, the first daughter of Busher’s contemporary, Twilight Tear, posted an upset victory, winning by six lengths.

Whether she was injured, or simply fell off her training, Princess Lygia was retired for the year following the Princess Pat Stakes. Furthermore, she lost out on the Champion Juvenile Filly title to Matron and Selima Stakes winner Rose Jet

Unfortunately, The Princess never regained her juvenile form. At three, she won only one big race, but she was close in several others. Her first major engagement of the year was the $22,700 Sea Breeze Stakes at Hollywood Park in mid-May 1952. She was beaten a head by Tonga, though she did manage to outfinish old rival A Gleam.

Encouraged by her near miss, Mayer next pointed The Princess at the Hollywood Oaks, run in the first week of June. The top three finishers of the Sea Breeze were back, and this time the finish was reversed; A Gleam “finished full of run”, while Princess Lygia “could not handle the stretch drive” of her rival. Tonga, outrun early, drove on to finish third. 

It was next on to Debonair Stakes in mid-June, and once again The Princess lost to her rival A Gleam, who skipped to a three length score. Princess Lygia lost ground in the stretch and was overtaken by the gelding Stranglehold for second. 

The Princess had a chance to step out from the shadow of A Gleam in the Ramona Handicap on July 5, but she was instead overshadowed by another champion mare. Two Lea, then in the midst of a triumphant return to racing after being sidelined by ringbone, “laid back in last place in the field”, before surging to the front with a determined finish. The Princess ended up in a dead heat for second with the older mare Ruth Lily.

Princess Lygia had once last big win in her, and this came in the Misty Isle Stakes at Arlington in late August. Almost exactly one year and a month after her last stakes victory, in the Arlington Lassie, the former undefeated champion made a triumphant return to the winner’s circle. She carried 122 pounds and was the favorite in the the field. Her only real competition seemed to be British-bred *Papoose, a daughter of champion juvenile colt Menow. In the end, Princess Lygia galloped to a four length victory, with Papoose finishing third. 

A week later came her last race. In the Sheridan Handicap at Washington Park, she was beaten by future Hawthorne Gold Cup winner Sub Fleet, piloted by Eddie Arcaro. It was close at the end, though. The Princess never gave up and Sub Fleet had to run “the fastest mile of the Chicago season” to beat her.

The Princess was a fine, if not particularly distinguished, broodmare. She was first mated in 1954, at age 5, and her first stallion was British import *Royal Charger, still in his first few years of stud in the US. The result was the filly Royal Lygia, undistinguished as both racer and broodmare.

She was given two years off before being sent back to *Royal Charger. This time the foal was colt, Prince Charger, who was stakes-placed and earned over $30,000. In 1958, she was matched with a cheap *Alibhai stallion named Quick Wink, the result of which was the colt Prince of Plenty. He was perhaps her most successful racer, winning one division of the Will Rogers Stakes and placing in both the Debonair Stakes and Bay District Handicap 

A few years later, in 1963, she was sent to Hollywood Gold Cup winner Prince Blessed, and from that produced the filly Maskette (not to be confused with the two-time champion filly of the early 20th century), who won only one race and produced even less at stud

Princess Lygia’s final foal, the filly Fleet Lygia, was her only one who left a mark at stud. Both of Fleet Lygia’s sons were stakes runners, and her older son Feisty Fighter won the 1979 Tenacious Handicap 

10AM
August 1948 - Algasir, a two-year-old son of *Sir Gallahad III, was sold to Mrs. F. Ambrose Clark for $106,000,  a record at the time for a juvenile gelding. The bidding was fierce for the highly promising gelding, who had set a world record going four furlongs in his debut race at Belmont in June
Two weeks later, Algasir carried the Clark colors for the first time, and dashed away with the Babylon Handicap at Aqueduct. With Ted Atkinson in the irons and burdened with 121 pounds, Algasir got the six furlongs in “a snappy 1:12 1/5”.

August 1948 - Algasir, a two-year-old son of *Sir Gallahad III, was sold to Mrs. F. Ambrose Clark for $106,000,  a record at the time for a juvenile gelding. The bidding was fierce for the highly promising gelding, who had set a world record going four furlongs in his debut race at Belmont in June

Two weeks later, Algasir carried the Clark colors for the first time, and dashed away with the Babylon Handicap at Aqueduct. With Ted Atkinson in the irons and burdened with 121 pounds, Algasir got the six furlongs in “a snappy 1:12 1/5”.

July122014
July112014
“Nashua…was a playboy who found distraction in everything. He reared and snatched his handlers around in the walking ring. He was ‘fractious at the post’. He played cat-and-mouse with opponents when he might have whaled the daylights out of them. He watched the infield and the stands. He shied from the strange objects which came out on the track to take pictures. He propped near the finish. Orders from jockeys he ignored, or, if the whip was laid on the the extent that he finally admitted having felt it, he was likely to repsond by going sidewise. What he could have done in the way of being a racehorse, if he could had put his mind to it, was never fully determined, because it never could be determined that he had put his mind to it.”
- Joe A Estes, American Race Horses 1935

Nashua…was a playboy who found distraction in everything. He reared and snatched his handlers around in the walking ring. He was ‘fractious at the post’. He played cat-and-mouse with opponents when he might have whaled the daylights out of them. He watched the infield and the stands. He shied from the strange objects which came out on the track to take pictures. He propped near the finish. Orders from jockeys he ignored, or, if the whip was laid on the the extent that he finally admitted having felt it, he was likely to repsond by going sidewise. What he could have done in the way of being a racehorse, if he could had put his mind to it, was never fully determined, because it never could be determined that he had put his mind to it.”

- Joe A Estes, American Race Horses 1935

9PM
4-year-old colt Black Seventeen winning the 2008 Vosburgh Stakes at Belmont, beating defending champ Fabulous Strike by a head 

4-year-old colt Black Seventeen winning the 2008 Vosburgh Stakes at Belmont, beating defending champ Fabulous Strike by a head