April62014
The ‘Chocolate Soldier” Equipoise, enjoying his retirement at owner C.V. Whitney’s Kentucky farm
Equipoise stood only four seasons at stud before his untimely death at the age of 10 in 1938. Nevertheless, he managed to sire 1942 Kentucky Derby and Belmont winner Shut Out, as well as stakes winners Bolingbroke, Equifox, Attention, Level Best, and Swing and Sway

The ‘Chocolate Soldier” Equipoise, enjoying his retirement at owner C.V. Whitney’s Kentucky farm

Equipoise stood only four seasons at stud before his untimely death at the age of 10 in 1938. Nevertheless, he managed to sire 1942 Kentucky Derby and Belmont winner Shut Out, as well as stakes winners Bolingbroke, Equifox, Attention, Level Best, and Swing and Sway

3PM
California Champion 3-Year-Old colt Real Cash winning an allowance at Santa Anita in early February 1990

California Champion 3-Year-Old colt Real Cash winning an allowance at Santa Anita in early February 1990

2PM

"Since 1987 the master floral designers from Kroger…have created and continued to enhance the garland of roses. The garland is ninety inches long and fourteen inches wide, and weighs approximately thirty-five pounds.

Each of the 564 roses used are hand selected ‘prime’ roses…The lining of the garland is made of green satin and features embroidery at each end…The center of the garland is made up of a ‘crown’ of roses and features the same number of roses as horses competing in the Derby. A single rose in the crown’s center is raised above the rest and symbolizes the struggle and heart displayed by the Derby winner…

Each individual rose that makes up the garland is inserted into its own water vial, and the roses are then hand-sewn to the garland with the vials hidden inside the lining. The outer edge is trimmed with a mix of fresh foliage such as coffee leaf, boxwood, and lemon leaf…”

- Two Minutes to Glory: The Official History of the Kentucky Derby, by Pamela K. Brodowsky and Tom Philbin

April32014
Blue Admiral
1946 son of War Admiral, out of Bird of Blue, by Bubbling Over
Unraced and with limited offspring

Blue Admiral

1946 son of War Admiral, out of Bird of Blue, by Bubbling Over

Unraced and with limited offspring

7PM

Taco and Chili 2014

Best friends as foals, now two-year-old preparing for their racing careers. How the time flies! 

(All photos from Stonestreet Farm)

12PM
12PM
Silver True in the sales ring
A 1964 daughter of Hail to Reason and Blue Hen mare Silver Fog, Silver True was a half-sister to Hall of Fame filly Silver Spoon. As a juvenile, Silver True won the 1966 Spinaway Stakes, and ran third to Tainted Lady in the Adirondack Stakes. She also placed in one division of the 1967 Test Stakes at three
The name of Silver True is still found in pedigrees today, mostly through one of her last foals. In 1978, the 14-year-old mare gave birth to a gray Buckpasser colt eventually named Silver Buck. Silver Buck was a multiple stakes winner during his career, but his true fame was as a stallion. He sired Hall of Fame champion Silver Charm, as well as graded stakes winners Forever Silver, Silver Survivor, Classic Endeavor, Silver of Silver, Bay Street Star, and Silver Maiden

Silver True in the sales ring

A 1964 daughter of Hail to Reason and Blue Hen mare Silver Fog, Silver True was a half-sister to Hall of Fame filly Silver Spoon. As a juvenile, Silver True won the 1966 Spinaway Stakes, and ran third to Tainted Lady in the Adirondack Stakes. She also placed in one division of the 1967 Test Stakes at three

The name of Silver True is still found in pedigrees today, mostly through one of her last foals. In 1978, the 14-year-old mare gave birth to a gray Buckpasser colt eventually named Silver Buck. Silver Buck was a multiple stakes winner during his career, but his true fame was as a stallion. He sired Hall of Fame champion Silver Charm, as well as graded stakes winners Forever Silver, Silver Survivor, Classic Endeavor, Silver of Silver, Bay Street Star, and Silver Maiden

11AM
April22014
4PM
Myrtle Charm
In 1948, racing fans looked forward eagerly to the debut of the first crop from two-time champion colt Alsab. First came the precocious talent of Alsab’s Day, who won the Pollyanna Stakes early in the season. Soon after, though, came Myrtle Charm
Myrtle Charm was bred by the partnership of Brownell and Leslie Combs II, and born at Spendthrift Farm in 1946. Her dam was Crepe Myrtle, an unsuccessful racing daughter of Equipoise out of Combs’ champion mare Myrtlewood. Her pedigree and good looks saw her sold for $27,000 as a yearling, to Mrs. Elizabeth Arden’s Maine Chance Farm. She would carry the Maine Chance Colors throughout her career
On August 9, 1948, Myrtle Charm made her racing debut in a six-furlong maiden event at Washington Park, which she won handily by eight lengths. A little over a week later, she made her stakes debut at Saratoga in the Spinaway Stakes. She left a field of “fashionably bred junior misses” looking like they were “struggling uphill in showshoes”, streaking to a 12-length victory. Myrtle Charm’s time for the race was the fastest of the meeting for a juvenile horse
On the strength of those two victories alone, many racing experts tagged Myrtle Charm as the best two-year-old of the year, male or female. As such, she was the heavy favorite for the rich Matron Stakes a month later at Belmont. The field consisted of 14 other juvenile fillies, including Demoiselle Stakes winner Lithe. Jockey Ted Atkinson sent Myrtle Charm straight to the lead, and there she stayed throughout the six furlong race. She won by an easy five lengths, with Stole in second and Lithe in third
A week later, Myrtle Charm met her first defeat. She was the only filly in the field of the $100,000 Futurity Stakes at Belmont Park, but she was the betting favorite. The race was seen mostly as a match-up between the undisputed queen of racing, Myrtle Charm, and the acknowledged male champion, Blue Peter. And it proved to be a two-horse race, with the pair racing neck-and-neck through the six and a half furlongs. Blue Peter eventually prevailed by a half-length, after Myrtle Charm “swerved repeatedly” late in the race
Both Myrtle Charm and Blue Peter were named the champions of their respective divisions. Ironically, both horses also sat our their three-year-old careers, despite being nominated to many prominent races
Returning to the track at four, Myrtle Charm had one last big race in her. In the week prior to the $20,000 Modesty Stakes at Arlignton, the four-year-old mare unofficially broke a world record during a morning workout. The race itself was much the same, with Myrtle Charm spinning home six lengths in front of Alsab’s Day. At the end of 1950, she was retired to broodmare duty at Maine Chance Farm
Like her father, Myrtle Charm was an immediate success at stud. Her first foal, sired by Kentucky Derby winner Jet Pilot, was the filly Myrtle’s Jet. Myrtle’s Jet was a multiple stakes winner, whose victories included the Frizette and Alcibiades Stakes, and the Honeymoon and Columbiana Handicaps
Jet’s Charm, a full sister to Myrtle’s Jet, was born in 1954. Myrtle Charm’s second daughter was less successful on the track, but still managed to place in both the Matron and Astarita Stakes
In 1958, Myrtle Charm was matched with Jet Action, a son of Jet Pilot. The result of that was the filly Fair Charmer, winner of only one race from four starts. Fair Charmer, in turn, produced 1972 Fair Ground Oaks winner My Charmer, better known to history as the dam of 1977 Triple Crown winner Seattle Slew
Myrtle Charm died in 1964, at age 18. She was buried at Maine Chance Farm, where she remains to this day

Myrtle Charm

In 1948, racing fans looked forward eagerly to the debut of the first crop from two-time champion colt Alsab. First came the precocious talent of Alsab’s Day, who won the Pollyanna Stakes early in the season. Soon after, though, came Myrtle Charm

Myrtle Charm was bred by the partnership of Brownell and Leslie Combs II, and born at Spendthrift Farm in 1946. Her dam was Crepe Myrtle, an unsuccessful racing daughter of Equipoise out of Combs’ champion mare Myrtlewood. Her pedigree and good looks saw her sold for $27,000 as a yearling, to Mrs. Elizabeth Arden’s Maine Chance Farm. She would carry the Maine Chance Colors throughout her career

On August 9, 1948, Myrtle Charm made her racing debut in a six-furlong maiden event at Washington Park, which she won handily by eight lengths. A little over a week later, she made her stakes debut at Saratoga in the Spinaway Stakes. She left a field of “fashionably bred junior misses” looking like they were “struggling uphill in showshoes”, streaking to a 12-length victory. Myrtle Charm’s time for the race was the fastest of the meeting for a juvenile horse

On the strength of those two victories alone, many racing experts tagged Myrtle Charm as the best two-year-old of the year, male or female. As such, she was the heavy favorite for the rich Matron Stakes a month later at Belmont. The field consisted of 14 other juvenile fillies, including Demoiselle Stakes winner Lithe. Jockey Ted Atkinson sent Myrtle Charm straight to the lead, and there she stayed throughout the six furlong race. She won by an easy five lengths, with Stole in second and Lithe in third

A week later, Myrtle Charm met her first defeat. She was the only filly in the field of the $100,000 Futurity Stakes at Belmont Park, but she was the betting favorite. The race was seen mostly as a match-up between the undisputed queen of racing, Myrtle Charm, and the acknowledged male champion, Blue Peter. And it proved to be a two-horse race, with the pair racing neck-and-neck through the six and a half furlongs. Blue Peter eventually prevailed by a half-length, after Myrtle Charm “swerved repeatedly” late in the race

Both Myrtle Charm and Blue Peter were named the champions of their respective divisions. Ironically, both horses also sat our their three-year-old careers, despite being nominated to many prominent races

Returning to the track at four, Myrtle Charm had one last big race in her. In the week prior to the $20,000 Modesty Stakes at Arlignton, the four-year-old mare unofficially broke a world record during a morning workout. The race itself was much the same, with Myrtle Charm spinning home six lengths in front of Alsab’s Day. At the end of 1950, she was retired to broodmare duty at Maine Chance Farm

Like her father, Myrtle Charm was an immediate success at stud. Her first foal, sired by Kentucky Derby winner Jet Pilot, was the filly Myrtle’s Jet. Myrtle’s Jet was a multiple stakes winner, whose victories included the Frizette and Alcibiades Stakes, and the Honeymoon and Columbiana Handicaps

Jet’s Charm, a full sister to Myrtle’s Jet, was born in 1954. Myrtle Charm’s second daughter was less successful on the track, but still managed to place in both the Matron and Astarita Stakes

In 1958, Myrtle Charm was matched with Jet Action, a son of Jet Pilot. The result of that was the filly Fair Charmer, winner of only one race from four starts. Fair Charmer, in turn, produced 1972 Fair Ground Oaks winner My Charmer, better known to history as the dam of 1977 Triple Crown winner Seattle Slew

Myrtle Charm died in 1964, at age 18. She was buried at Maine Chance Farm, where she remains to this day

3PM
Rex Ellsworth’s multiple stakes-winning colt Olden Times with trainer Mesh Tenney up

Rex Ellsworth’s multiple stakes-winning colt Olden Times with trainer Mesh Tenney up

March312014
“You know, when I go to the great beyond, I hope there is some place where the horses can run again.” Sam Riddle, owner/breeder or Man o’ War and his offspring, in a 1940 DRF interview
March302014

goforbold asked: Happy Birthday, Megan!

:D

Thanks hun!

March292014
It’s that time of year again! 
Unfortunately I will be out most of the day and I didn’t have the chance to queue up some stuff last night, so for now this is what I’m doing XD
Anyways, once again, Happy Birthday to the greatest American racehorse in history, De Mostest Hoss, Big Red, Mannie Wah…whatever you call him, it’s wonderful Man o’ War’s birthday!

It’s that time of year again! 

Unfortunately I will be out most of the day and I didn’t have the chance to queue up some stuff last night, so for now this is what I’m doing XD

Anyways, once again, Happy Birthday to the greatest American racehorse in history, De Mostest Hoss, Big Red, Mannie Wah…whatever you call him, it’s wonderful Man o’ War’s birthday!

March282014