March292014
It’s that time of year again! 
Unfortunately I will be out most of the day and I didn’t have the chance to queue up some stuff last night, so for now this is what I’m doing XD
Anyways, once again, Happy Birthday to the greatest American racehorse in history, De Mostest Hoss, Big Red, Mannie Wah…whatever you call him, it’s wonderful Man o’ War’s birthday!

It’s that time of year again! 

Unfortunately I will be out most of the day and I didn’t have the chance to queue up some stuff last night, so for now this is what I’m doing XD

Anyways, once again, Happy Birthday to the greatest American racehorse in history, De Mostest Hoss, Big Red, Mannie Wah…whatever you call him, it’s wonderful Man o’ War’s birthday!

March282014
8PM
In 1969, undefeated colt Majestic Prince was making a run at the Triple Crown. The same year, his dam Gay Hostess gave birth to his full brother and look-alike Crowned Prince
Though blessed with his older brother’s striking chestnut colt and hind socks, Crowned Prince was built more for sprinting or miling. As a yearling, he was sold at Keeneland for $510,000, and from there shipped to race in England. His career consisted of just four races, but with two big wins in the Champagne and Dewhurst Stakes, he was named the Champion Juvenile Colt of 1971
The true talent of Crowned Prince will never be known; in addition to his brother’s looks, he also ended up with sire Raise a Native's weak ankles. He was retired after completing his juvenile season, initially standing stud in Europe and later being sent to Japan. Though he sired a handful of good stakes winners throughout Europe, he is probably best remembered as the damsire of Australian millionaire Zeditave

In 1969, undefeated colt Majestic Prince was making a run at the Triple Crown. The same year, his dam Gay Hostess gave birth to his full brother and look-alike Crowned Prince

Though blessed with his older brother’s striking chestnut colt and hind socks, Crowned Prince was built more for sprinting or miling. As a yearling, he was sold at Keeneland for $510,000, and from there shipped to race in England. His career consisted of just four races, but with two big wins in the Champagne and Dewhurst Stakes, he was named the Champion Juvenile Colt of 1971

The true talent of Crowned Prince will never be known; in addition to his brother’s looks, he also ended up with sire Raise a Native's weak ankles. He was retired after completing his juvenile season, initially standing stud in Europe and later being sent to Japan. Though he sired a handful of good stakes winners throughout Europe, he is probably best remembered as the damsire of Australian millionaire Zeditave

March252014

tackless asked: Hi :3

Sweet! Alright so here goes:

"I’m Henry VIII, I am"

"I may not always love you, but as long as there are stars above you"

"Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?"

"I am as ugly as I seem"

"Mom and dad don’t look so hot these days"

What a strange poem…

(Songs are: “I’m Henry VIII I Am” by Herman’s Hermits, “God Only Knows” by the Beach Boys, “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen, “As Ugly As I Seem” by the White Stripes, and “Brat” by Green Day

9PM

imbryonykate:

Send me a ‘hi’ and I will put my playlist on shuffle, write down the first line of five songs and give it to you as a poem.

(Source: inboxshenanigans, via webuiltthepyramids)

March232014
Battlefield secures his status as the Champion Juvenile of 1950 with a narrow and willful victory over Big Stretch in the Belmont Futurity 
Purchased for a paltry $4,500 as a yearling by George Widener, Battlefield churned out 10 wins from 13 starts at two, including the Youthful, Tremont, Sapling, Saratoga Special, and Hopeful Stakes. He was a heavily bet favorite coming into the Futurity, but was nearly upset when he was “outrun early in the six-and-a-half furlong spin”. He came on quickly at the end, though, and nosed out Greentree Farm’s Pimlico Futurity winning gelding Big Stretch 
In addition to the top two, the rest of the field boasted several future stars of the sport. Coming in third was a 36-1 longshot called Rough’N Tumble, later the sire of the legendary Dr Fager. A nose behind him was Grand Union Hotel Stakes winner and future Kentucky Derby favorite Battle Morn, followed by To Market, who would go on to build a career of multiple stakes wins and three track records

Battlefield secures his status as the Champion Juvenile of 1950 with a narrow and willful victory over Big Stretch in the Belmont Futurity 

Purchased for a paltry $4,500 as a yearling by George Widener, Battlefield churned out 10 wins from 13 starts at two, including the Youthful, Tremont, Sapling, Saratoga Special, and Hopeful Stakes. He was a heavily bet favorite coming into the Futurity, but was nearly upset when he was “outrun early in the six-and-a-half furlong spin”. He came on quickly at the end, though, and nosed out Greentree Farm’s Pimlico Futurity winning gelding Big Stretch 

In addition to the top two, the rest of the field boasted several future stars of the sport. Coming in third was a 36-1 longshot called Rough’N Tumble, later the sire of the legendary Dr Fager. A nose behind him was Grand Union Hotel Stakes winner and future Kentucky Derby favorite Battle Morn, followed by To Market, who would go on to build a career of multiple stakes wins and three track records

2PM
Lightly-regarded juvenile filly Honeybee Lucky posts an upset victory in the 1967 Cinderella Stakes at Hollywood Park, beating 58-1 longshot Hula Bend by a half-length, with Dovecote in third and favorited Everything Lovely in fourth
Guided by rising star Alvaro Pineda, Honeybee Lucky sat back from pace-setting Dovecote, but moved past her late in the five-furlong race

Lightly-regarded juvenile filly Honeybee Lucky posts an upset victory in the 1967 Cinderella Stakes at Hollywood Park, beating 58-1 longshot Hula Bend by a half-length, with Dovecote in third and favorited Everything Lovely in fourth

Guided by rising star Alvaro Pineda, Honeybee Lucky sat back from pace-setting Dovecote, but moved past her late in the five-furlong race

1PM
Popular mare Molly Brant wins her second straight Delaware Handicap at Saratoga in 1905
The 5-year-old daughter of two-time Horse of the Year Clifford had been made the favorite to repeat in the 1905 Delaware, but she had very stiff competition. The seven horse field also included 1904 Horse of the Year Beldame, future sprinting legend Roseben, Preakness and Dwyer Stakes winner Cairngorm, and multiple stakes winning gelding Dolly Spanker. Despite this, Molly Brant was “the easiest of winners”, skipping home two lengths in front of the tightly-bunched pack, and in a time that bested her own record from the previous year 
The gelding Dolly Spanker edged Cairngorm by a neck for second, with Monsieur Beaucaire in fourth. Beldame, who had set the pace for most of the early part of the race, faded back to fifth 

Popular mare Molly Brant wins her second straight Delaware Handicap at Saratoga in 1905

The 5-year-old daughter of two-time Horse of the Year Clifford had been made the favorite to repeat in the 1905 Delaware, but she had very stiff competition. The seven horse field also included 1904 Horse of the Year Beldame, future sprinting legend Roseben, Preakness and Dwyer Stakes winner Cairngorm, and multiple stakes winning gelding Dolly Spanker. Despite this, Molly Brant was “the easiest of winners”, skipping home two lengths in front of the tightly-bunched pack, and in a time that bested her own record from the previous year 

The gelding Dolly Spanker edged Cairngorm by a neck for second, with Monsieur Beaucaire in fourth. Beldame, who had set the pace for most of the early part of the race, faded back to fifth 

March222014
afleetalexandra:


Dead Man Riding
Frank Hayes, stableman and trainer by trade, and maiden racer Sweet Kiss hold a bizarre distinction in racing history. The pair competed in only one race, and though they won, it was what happened afterwards that puts them in the record books
7-year-old Sweet Kiss was not well thought-of by her owners. Frank Hayes, who had cared for her, was convinced that she could win a race. On June 4, 1923, he was given his wish, when he and Sweet Kiss lined up for a 2-mile, 12-jump race at Belmont Park. Rated at 20-1 odds, they were not expected to do anything special
Surprisingly, the hard-working filly and her makeshift jockey won by a head. When the overjoyed owner and trainer approached to lead her to the winner’s circle, they made a shocking discovery: Frank Hayes was dead in the saddle
A heart attack had killed Hayes sometime during the later part of the race. It was noticed that Sweet Kiss had swerved slightly while approaching the final jump, and many surmised that her swerve had been caused by Hayes slumping forward in the saddle. Since he had stayed on her back the entire race, Sweet Kiss was declared the winner, making Hayes the first (and so far, only) jockey to have won a race after death. He is also the only known jockey to have an undefeated record. Hayes was buried in his racing silks three days later
Sweet Kiss, meanwhile, was never raced again. Though she was a proven winner, no other jockey would dare to ride her. She was thereafter nicknamed “Sweet Kiss of Death”

afleetalexandra:

Dead Man Riding

Frank Hayes, stableman and trainer by trade, and maiden racer Sweet Kiss hold a bizarre distinction in racing history. The pair competed in only one race, and though they won, it was what happened afterwards that puts them in the record books

7-year-old Sweet Kiss was not well thought-of by her owners. Frank Hayes, who had cared for her, was convinced that she could win a race. On June 4, 1923, he was given his wish, when he and Sweet Kiss lined up for a 2-mile, 12-jump race at Belmont Park. Rated at 20-1 odds, they were not expected to do anything special

Surprisingly, the hard-working filly and her makeshift jockey won by a head. When the overjoyed owner and trainer approached to lead her to the winner’s circle, they made a shocking discovery: Frank Hayes was dead in the saddle

A heart attack had killed Hayes sometime during the later part of the race. It was noticed that Sweet Kiss had swerved slightly while approaching the final jump, and many surmised that her swerve had been caused by Hayes slumping forward in the saddle. Since he had stayed on her back the entire race, Sweet Kiss was declared the winner, making Hayes the first (and so far, only) jockey to have won a race after death. He is also the only known jockey to have an undefeated record. Hayes was buried in his racing silks three days later

Sweet Kiss, meanwhile, was never raced again. Though she was a proven winner, no other jockey would dare to ride her. She was thereafter nicknamed “Sweet Kiss of Death”

(via debilitatingdoubt)

March212014

Anonymous asked: Opinions on the Asmussen debacle?

Don’t let the door hit him on his way out

Steve Asmussen is, at this point, a huge liability in a sport that is already seeped in controversy and rapidly losing fans. He is a figure that attracts negative publicity, something racing cannot afford. The HOF was absolutely right in revoking his nomination, I was honestly shocked that he was given one in the first place. We cannot glorify someone like him

As to if I believe the allegations or not, I very much do. No one who is constantly under fire like him can be totally innocent. And there is a disturbing trend in his horses to lose form suddenly or injure themselves. Now at least we know how they managed to ruin Nehro. And let us not forget his equally slimy assistant Blasi, who may even be worse than his boss

He ought to have been banned years ago, but we all know it never works like that. How many horses did Dutrow have to kill before his ban actually stuck? The more of these trainers we can weed out and ban, the better. The problem is that no one wants to go after the famous ones…

And truly, I am no fan of PETA. To be more truthful, I despise them. However, if this scheme of theirs helps oust abusive trainers, I may just have to thank them this once

9PM

Steve Asmussen’s 2014 Hall of Fame nomination has been revoked

Following allegations of abuse and mistreatment by PETA, the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame has taken Asmussen’s name off of the 2014 ballots

March202014
Two-year-old filly Sungari, a daughter of American stallion Eight Thirty, wins the fillies division of the 1950 National Stallion Stakes at Belmont Park, edging Fashion Stakes winner Remove by a neck
Carrying the colors of owner/breeder George Widener and trained by Winbert Mullholland, Sungari also won the 1950 Colleen and Astoria Stakes

Two-year-old filly Sungari, a daughter of American stallion Eight Thirty, wins the fillies division of the 1950 National Stallion Stakes at Belmont Park, edging Fashion Stakes winner Remove by a neck

Carrying the colors of owner/breeder George Widener and trained by Winbert Mullholland, Sungari also won the 1950 Colleen and Astoria Stakes

9PM
9PM

Anonymous asked: have you eve seen a really good colored picture of busher, I found your site while looking for one, but all I find are black and white, by the way you have a cool site, all the pictures of the older horses are amazing- love all the whirlaway pics

To my knowledge, there are no color pictures of Busher. But that is only to my knowledge, which means that if there are any, they are in a private collection or just not on the internet (or in any of the books/magazines I own)

To find color pictures of racing mares from the 30’s-40’s is difficult, because most of the color pictures of older champions are taken during their stud career. Stallions, especially popular/famous ones, are always easier to get to than mares. Thus, color pictures are more common of older male champions 

Such as War Admiral:

image

Omaha:

image

Whirlaway:

image

Count Fleet:

image

Citation:

image

Anyways, thanks for the message!

March162014
Mr Longtail and Friend
1941 Triple Crown champion Whirlaway bedding down for a nap with groom Dan Barnett

Mr Longtail and Friend

1941 Triple Crown champion Whirlaway bedding down for a nap with groom Dan Barnett