June152014

Anonymous said: Why is watching Jess's Dream unfortunate? This isnt meant to sound mean of course just curious!

Yeah, I probably worded that badly. What I meant to say was that Jess’s Dream is an unfortunate name, not that it would be unfortunate to watch him lol

8PM
1951 Wood Memorial winner Repetoire flying to Churchill Downs to compete in the Kentucky Derby, accompanied by trainer Alfred Jensen

1951 Wood Memorial winner Repetoire flying to Churchill Downs to compete in the Kentucky Derby, accompanied by trainer Alfred Jensen

8PM
8PM
Iotapa by kimpossible pics on Flickr.

Loving this filly right now, she’s her father’s daughter

Iotapa by kimpossible pics on Flickr.

Loving this filly right now, she’s her father’s daughter

7PM
Registered white Thoroughbred mare Precious Beauty with her 1998 Marquetry colt Royal Marquee 
Precious Beauty, a third-generation white mare, was unraced. Of her seven registered foals, only one other was white. That filly, Patchen Beauty, was thought to be the only actively racing white Thoroughbred during her career. She has also carried on the white genes, producing five registered white foals before her death in 2013
Royal Marquee died sometime during 2000

Registered white Thoroughbred mare Precious Beauty with her 1998 Marquetry colt Royal Marquee 

Precious Beauty, a third-generation white mare, was unraced. Of her seven registered foals, only one other was white. That filly, Patchen Beauty, was thought to be the only actively racing white Thoroughbred during her career. She has also carried on the white genes, producing five registered white foals before her death in 2013

Royal Marquee died sometime during 2000

7PM
7PM
"If Count Fleet is the spectacular comet in the racing skies of 1943, then Blue Swords is the comet’s tail” - The Blood-Horse Magazine 
Unlucky enough to be born in the same crop as Count Fleet, Blue Swords was a son of Blue Larkspur and a Man o’ War mare named Flaming Swords. Over the course of two years he faced the Count six times, but never bested him. Most notably, Blue Swords ran second in the Count’s Kentucky Derby, Wood Memorial, and Preakness Stakes 

"If Count Fleet is the spectacular comet in the racing skies of 1943, then Blue Swords is the comet’s tail” - The Blood-Horse Magazine 

Unlucky enough to be born in the same crop as Count Fleet, Blue Swords was a son of Blue Larkspur and a Man o’ War mare named Flaming Swords. Over the course of two years he faced the Count six times, but never bested him. Most notably, Blue Swords ran second in the Count’s Kentucky Derby, Wood Memorial, and Preakness Stakes 

7PM

:D

I’m so glad you like my blog! These are my favorite type of messages <3

At the moment…the only juvenile I’ve got my eyes on answers to the name of Jess’s Dream (unfortunately)

PS I fucking love writing those comebacks XD

June132014
Jet Pilot wears the roses after winning the 1947 Kentucky Derby, while trainer &#8220;Silent&#8221; Tom Smith shakes hands with advisor Leslie Combs II, who had advocated for the purchase of Jet Pilot by Mrs. Elizabeth Arden (center)

Jet Pilot wears the roses after winning the 1947 Kentucky Derby, while trainer “Silent” Tom Smith shakes hands with advisor Leslie Combs II, who had advocated for the purchase of Jet Pilot by Mrs. Elizabeth Arden (center)

3PM
Big Event 
Broodmares don&#8217;t come with a richer bloodline than did Big Event. Born in 1938 at E.R. Bradley&#8217;s Idle Hour Farm, she was the fourth daughter of imported French Blue Hen mare *La Troienne. Her sire was 1929 Horse of the Year and leading stallion Blue Larkspur. In the year she was born, her older half-brother Bimelech was still a yearling and her half-sister Big Hurry won the Selima Stakes
Big Event was a competent, in uninspired, racer. She made her 9 career starts as a juvenile, and her best race was a second-place finish behind Valdina Myth in the 1940 Selima Stakes 
Like her mother and so many of her sisters, Big Event made her name as a broodmare. Bradley took special care with the breeding of La Troienne&#8217;s daughters, and this was no exception. He had previously been convinced to match Big Event&#8217;s half-sister Baby League to 1937 Triple Crown winner War Admiral, despite his disdain for the &#8220;hot blood&#8221; of the Hastings line. The very next year, he sent Big Event to meet War Admiral for her first breeding 
The result of Baby League and the Admiral was the phenomenal Busher. Big Event&#8217;s Admiral foal was slightly less impressive. The chestnut filly, born in 1944, was named Blue Eyed Momo. She won only one race from 10 starts, but more than made up for it when she produced 1960 Wood Memorial and Dwyer Stakes winner Francis S. Blue Eyed Momo can be found in the pedigrees of multiple Grade 1 winner Ogygian and Champion Juvenile Filly It&#8217;s In The Air 
Big Event was matched with War Admiral again in 1945, probably as a result of Busher&#8217;s success on the track. This time it was a bay colt named Promotion, whose career highlight was equaling the track record at Ascot going 1&#160;1/2 miles. He had limited offspring at stud
Colonel E.R. Bradley died in 1946, and his Idle Hour Farm was divided and sold. Big Event was purchased by Greentree Farm, and she lived there until her death. Her new owners decided to match her with relatively new stallion Devil Diver, a two-time Champion Handicap Horse. The resulting colt was named Boxing Day, but he failed to do much on the track or in the breeding shed
Big Event finally lived up to her family when she produced a dark bay gelding in 1948 to the cover of Derby/Belmont winner Shut Out. Optimistically named Hall of Fame, he was one of the top 3-year-old&#8217;s of 1951. Over the course of his career, he won such races as the American Derby, Arlington Classic, Kent Stakes, Narragansett Special, and Leonard Richards Stakes. He further finished second in the Empire City Handicap and third in the Blue Grass and Peter Pan Stakes. After his retirement, he joined the legendary Gashouse Gang at Greentree, which also included infertile 1931 Horse of the Year Twenty Grand and champion steeplechaser Jolly Roger
Big Event next produced two full sisters to Hall of Fame. The first, Blackball, was unraced and sent to England at 10 years old. Prior to her leaving, she produced a grey colt called The Axe to the cover of *Mahmoud. The Axe, who was sent to England as a yearling and registered there, was a multiple stakes winner on both sides of the Atlantic. Ironically enough, the first foal Blackball produced in England was the colt Malicious, who was sent to America as a yearling. Malicious won a major stakes race every year he raced, from 2 to 5. His highlights include the Jim Dandy and Aqueduct Stakes, and the Stymie Handicap
The second of these two fillies was Queen Caroline, who was a name amongst the 3-year-old fillies of 1954. That year, she finished third in the inaugural Florida Oaks behind Queen Hopeful. Queen Caroline was a decent broodmare, producing over 10 foals, but most were of indifferent quality 
In 1955, the 17-year-old mare was sent to the legendary &#8220;Grey Ghost&#8221; Native Dancer, who was making his debut at stud. Big Event gave birth in late February 1956, but foaling complications developed and she passed away the next day. Her newborn foal, a chestnut gelding named Audience, was raised by a nurse mare. He was a hardy and durable racer, setting a track record at Aqueduct for 6.5 furlongs at the age of 7. Upon his retirement, he also joined the Gashouse Gang at Greentree 

Big Event 

Broodmares don’t come with a richer bloodline than did Big Event. Born in 1938 at E.R. Bradley’s Idle Hour Farm, she was the fourth daughter of imported French Blue Hen mare *La Troienne. Her sire was 1929 Horse of the Year and leading stallion Blue Larkspur. In the year she was born, her older half-brother Bimelech was still a yearling and her half-sister Big Hurry won the Selima Stakes

Big Event was a competent, in uninspired, racer. She made her 9 career starts as a juvenile, and her best race was a second-place finish behind Valdina Myth in the 1940 Selima Stakes 

Like her mother and so many of her sisters, Big Event made her name as a broodmare. Bradley took special care with the breeding of La Troienne’s daughters, and this was no exception. He had previously been convinced to match Big Event’s half-sister Baby League to 1937 Triple Crown winner War Admiral, despite his disdain for the “hot blood” of the Hastings line. The very next year, he sent Big Event to meet War Admiral for her first breeding 

The result of Baby League and the Admiral was the phenomenal Busher. Big Event’s Admiral foal was slightly less impressive. The chestnut filly, born in 1944, was named Blue Eyed Momo. She won only one race from 10 starts, but more than made up for it when she produced 1960 Wood Memorial and Dwyer Stakes winner Francis S. Blue Eyed Momo can be found in the pedigrees of multiple Grade 1 winner Ogygian and Champion Juvenile Filly It’s In The Air

Big Event was matched with War Admiral again in 1945, probably as a result of Busher’s success on the track. This time it was a bay colt named Promotion, whose career highlight was equaling the track record at Ascot going 1 1/2 miles. He had limited offspring at stud

Colonel E.R. Bradley died in 1946, and his Idle Hour Farm was divided and sold. Big Event was purchased by Greentree Farm, and she lived there until her death. Her new owners decided to match her with relatively new stallion Devil Diver, a two-time Champion Handicap Horse. The resulting colt was named Boxing Day, but he failed to do much on the track or in the breeding shed

Big Event finally lived up to her family when she produced a dark bay gelding in 1948 to the cover of Derby/Belmont winner Shut Out. Optimistically named Hall of Fame, he was one of the top 3-year-old’s of 1951. Over the course of his career, he won such races as the American Derby, Arlington Classic, Kent Stakes, Narragansett Special, and Leonard Richards Stakes. He further finished second in the Empire City Handicap and third in the Blue Grass and Peter Pan Stakes. After his retirement, he joined the legendary Gashouse Gang at Greentree, which also included infertile 1931 Horse of the Year Twenty Grand and champion steeplechaser Jolly Roger

Big Event next produced two full sisters to Hall of Fame. The first, Blackball, was unraced and sent to England at 10 years old. Prior to her leaving, she produced a grey colt called The Axe to the cover of *Mahmoud. The Axe, who was sent to England as a yearling and registered there, was a multiple stakes winner on both sides of the Atlantic. Ironically enough, the first foal Blackball produced in England was the colt Malicious, who was sent to America as a yearling. Malicious won a major stakes race every year he raced, from 2 to 5. His highlights include the Jim Dandy and Aqueduct Stakes, and the Stymie Handicap

The second of these two fillies was Queen Caroline, who was a name amongst the 3-year-old fillies of 1954. That year, she finished third in the inaugural Florida Oaks behind Queen Hopeful. Queen Caroline was a decent broodmare, producing over 10 foals, but most were of indifferent quality 

In 1955, the 17-year-old mare was sent to the legendary “Grey Ghost” Native Dancer, who was making his debut at stud. Big Event gave birth in late February 1956, but foaling complications developed and she passed away the next day. Her newborn foal, a chestnut gelding named Audience, was raised by a nurse mare. He was a hardy and durable racer, setting a track record at Aqueduct for 6.5 furlongs at the age of 7. Upon his retirement, he also joined the Gashouse Gang at Greentree 

2PM
The Last of a Legacy 
In 1949, the racing world mourned the death of 29-year-old imported French stallion *Sir Gallahad III. Since being sold to an American syndicate in 1926, *Sir Gallahad had continually been one of the leading sires in the country. Among his offspring were 1930 Triple Crown winner Gallant Fox, as well as Derby winners Gallahadion and Hoop Jr, Preakness winner High Quest, multiple stakes winner Fenelon, and champion sire Roman
Pictured here is the last filly ever sired by *Sir Gallahad III. The mare was 16-year-old Anna Shot, a daughter of British stallion *Sunshot. Appropriately named American Royal, the filly was unplaced in one start and produced six registered foals

The Last of a Legacy 

In 1949, the racing world mourned the death of 29-year-old imported French stallion *Sir Gallahad III. Since being sold to an American syndicate in 1926, *Sir Gallahad had continually been one of the leading sires in the country. Among his offspring were 1930 Triple Crown winner Gallant Fox, as well as Derby winners Gallahadion and Hoop Jr, Preakness winner High Quest, multiple stakes winner Fenelon, and champion sire Roman

Pictured here is the last filly ever sired by *Sir Gallahad III. The mare was 16-year-old Anna Shot, a daughter of British stallion *Sunshot. Appropriately named American Royal, the filly was unplaced in one start and produced six registered foals

1PM

Triple Crown 1950

In the weeks leading up the 1950 Kentucky Derby, several horses vied for the coveted “favorite” position. Middleground fired first in the Derby, carrying apprentice jockey Bill Boland to victory with Hill Prince second. One week later, Hill Prince avenged his defeat in the Wood Memorial, beating Middleground by 2. And again in the Preakness, Hill Prince was uncatchable, drawing away to win by 5 from Middleground. The Belmont was once again cast at the bumper match between the two. It was no match at all, really, as Hill Prince faded to 7th after fighting jockey Eddie Arcaro’s hold in the first part of the race. Middleground won by a length from Lights Up, with Mr Trouble third 

June82014

afleetalexandra:

Let’s take a minute to talk about this race, shall we?

War Admiral's performance in the 1937 Belmont Stakes is almost certainly the high point of his amazing career. Beyond just securing his place in history as America's fourth Triple Crown winner, the race cemented his status as one of our greatest champions. First, consider that the normally troublesome Admiral held up the start of the race for over seven minutes, actually dragging his assistant starter through the gate several times. Perhaps because he could sense the tension of those around him, War Admiral refused to calm down even in the gate. As a result, he stumbled badly on the break, nearly going down before the race even started. And as the result of that, he grabbed a quarter, tearing out a chunk of his right forefoot

Now, here we have a horse that had wasted considerable energy being restless in the gate and from numerous false starts. Add to that, his stumble had put him firmly behind the pack, a place Admiral hated to be. Finally, he now had a freely bleeding, extremely painful injury on one of his legs. He had three legitimate reasons to quit entirely and limp off the field. Instead, War Admiral ran the race of his life

As soon as he had his legs under him, it was over. He raced up to, and passed, the leaders in a matter of a few strides. And he just…kept going. Every stride sent blood gushing from his leg, staining his underbelly and the track, but Admiral never showed any sign of being in pain. The little brown son of Man o’ War eventually rolled under the finish line three lengths in front of his nearest rival, in a time that not only bested his father’s stakes record, but also equaled the American record for the distance. Running on “three legs and a heart”, the newest Triple Crown winner had never even been challenged, and had accomplished the rare feat of wiring the Belmont 

"That, under such circumstances, he should run the record-making race he did was a testimony of a gameness difficult to extol too highly."

9PM
1940&#8217;s stakes-winning gelding Lucky Draw with his trainer, Hall of Fame member Winbert F Mullholland

1940’s stakes-winning gelding Lucky Draw with his trainer, Hall of Fame member Winbert F Mullholland

9PM

Anonymous said: Do you know why Ride on Curlin was pulled up yesterday?

Indeed

Ride on Curlin was eased at the quarter pole because he was bleeding due to a pulmonary hemorrhage, which he apparently also done in one race as a two-year-old. 

He’s headed back to Kentucky tomorrow and will be getting a break. Trainer Billy Gowan blames the distance of the race and says he probably will never race Ride on Curlin at a mile and a half again