July302014
November 3, 1956 - Flemington Racecourse, Melbourne, Australia
One of the rarest sights in horse racing, a triple dead heat occurred in the 1956 Hotham Handicap (now known as the Lexus Stakes). The winners were (left to right) Fighting Force, Ark Royal (a multiple stakes winner and important sire), and Pandie Sun 

November 3, 1956 - Flemington Racecourse, Melbourne, Australia

One of the rarest sights in horse racing, a triple dead heat occurred in the 1956 Hotham Handicap (now known as the Lexus Stakes). The winners were (left to right) Fighting Force, Ark Royal (a multiple stakes winner and important sire), and Pandie Sun 

July292014
10PM
1990’s Kentucky Derby winner and Champion 3-Year-Old colt Unbridled peeks out from his stall at Claiborne Farm, which bears the names of all the previous occupants: Bold Ruler, Secretariat, and Easy Goer

1990’s Kentucky Derby winner and Champion 3-Year-Old colt Unbridled peeks out from his stall at Claiborne Farm, which bears the names of all the previous occupants: Bold Ruler, Secretariat, and Easy Goer

12AM

"At first glance the small dark War Admiral did not seem to resemble his big red sire at all. Only the smouldering eye that flamed in the face of competition and the high, proud head showed any relationship. Yet of all Man o’ War's fine offspring this one, least like him in appearance, was most like him in performance. Nearly all the others would wait behind the pace and make their bid in the stretch. Only this small dark colt had speed both early and late, and liked to use it to the utmost. Both War Admiral and his sire were impatient at the restraint of the barrier and wanted to go to the front at once, pouring speed on speed until the opposition wilted.”

Illustrator and racing historian C.W. Anderson

July282014
The “Mighty Atom” and the “Flying Dutchman”
War Admiral and jockey Charley Kurtsinger, after winning the 1937 Preakness Stakes

The “Mighty Atom” and the “Flying Dutchman”

War Admiral and jockey Charley Kurtsinger, after winning the 1937 Preakness Stakes

11PM

"That under such circumstances, he should have run the record-making race he did was testimony of a gameness difficult to extol too highly."

War Admiral winning the 1937 Belmont Stakes, and Triple Crown, after cutting a sizable gash in his right front leg while stumbling at the start 

"That under such circumstances, he should have run the record-making race he did was testimony of a gameness difficult to extol too highly."

War Admiral winning the 1937 Belmont Stakes, and Triple Crown, after cutting a sizable gash in his right front leg while stumbling at the start 

10PM
Elizabeth “Lizzie” Riddle, wife of Samuel Riddle, leans in to pat War Admiral at Saratoga, 1937
War Admiral was forced to miss the 1937 Travers Stakes, as he was still sidelined by the injury he suffered during the Belmont. However, the newly minted Triple Crown winner was paraded under tack at Saratoga following the Travers, and Mrs. Riddle was on hand to greet her champion. War Admiral, still in cotton wraps to protect his injured leg, refused to stand still while being saddled, “but lunged and plunged as though eager to join his old playmates, the assistant starters.”

Elizabeth “Lizzie” Riddle, wife of Samuel Riddle, leans in to pat War Admiral at Saratoga, 1937

War Admiral was forced to miss the 1937 Travers Stakes, as he was still sidelined by the injury he suffered during the Belmont. However, the newly minted Triple Crown winner was paraded under tack at Saratoga following the Travers, and Mrs. Riddle was on hand to greet her champion. War Admiral, still in cotton wraps to protect his injured leg, refused to stand still while being saddled, “but lunged and plunged as though eager to join his old playmates, the assistant starters.”

12PM

Bee Mac, War Admiral's “Dancing Daughter”

Born in 1941, Bee Mac came from the highly anticipated first crop of Triple Crown champion War Admiral (the crop of 1941 also included San Juan Capistrano winner Bric a Bac and Iron Maiden, later the dam of Kentucky Derby winner Iron Liege). Her dam, Baba Kenny, had been the Champion Juvenile filly of 1930

Bred by Colonel E.R. Bradley and born on his Idle Hour Stock Farm, the still-unnamed Bee Mac was given as a gift to Ms. Beatrice MacGuire in 1942. She was officially christened Bee Mac as a shortening of her new owner’s name, and given to the care of trainer James W. Smith

She raced only as a juvenile, and won only two major races, but for a time she was considered the champion of 1943. Her first big score came when she took the Spinaway Stakes over juvenile fillies in mid-August (bottom) Later the same month, she wired a group of promising young colts in the Hopeful Stakes at Belmont (top). While becoming the first filly to win the Hopeful in nearly 30 years, she also defeated the good stakes winners Boy Knight and By Jimminy, the latter of which would go on to be a champion at 3. In the words of the New York Times: “It is too early to pick a champion, and it is always risky to pick a filly as the best one, but Bee Mac left nothing to be desired when she led virtually from start to finish of the six and a half furlongs.”

When asked after the Hopeful what the future plans for the filly were, trainer J.W. Smith replied (rather cheekily) “Why not the Derby in ‘44?” Alas, it was not to be. Bee Mac was retired after her juvenile season, with three wins from seven starts and earnings of just under $45,000. She was returned to the farm of her birth for her first breeding season

Instead of the Derby in ‘44, Bee Mac was bred to two-time champion Bimelech. She produced a colt from that meeting, a good-looking bay. While that colt was a yearling, Colonel E.R. Bradley died. His brothers, not wanting to continue the storied Idle Hour breeding and racing, divided up the stock and farm into three lots. Bee Mac and her yearling son went with the lot given to the newly-established Kentucky division of the King Ranch.

That yearling would later gain fame under the name Better Self. As a juvenile, he won the East View Stakes and Saratoga Special, but he was best as an older horse. Better Self raced until he was 5, winning such as the Discovery, Carter, Gallant Fox, and Saratoga Handicaps. He was Bee Mac’s best racer, earning nearly $400,000 on the track. 

When Bee Mac was transferred to the King Ranch, she had been in foal to Bull Lea. She dropped a little brown colt not long after she arrived. That one, named Prophet’s Thumb, would emulate his older brother in winning the Discovery Handicap in 1949

She was bred back to Bull Lea, and from that came Beau Max in 1947. Beau Max did not measure up to Bee Mac’s first two colts, but he was much the best in the breeding shed. He was the sire of multiple stakes winning gelding How Now, and of Golden Notes, who set a world record going 6 1/2 furlongs on dirt in 1959.

In hopes of getting another Better Self, Bee Mac was sent back to Bimelech  in 1947. From this came another colt, named Black Douglas, but he was not another Better Self. He was stakes-placed and raced until he was four, but Black Douglas won no major races and produced no notable offspring

Given a year off for rest, Bee Mac was sent again to Bimelech in 1949, and from that produced her first daughter. The filly, named Mac Bea, was a juvenile stakes winner like her mother. She won the 1952 Marguerite Stakes and was third in the Selima. 

Another filly followed the next year, a *Princequillo daughter named Riverina. This was a good racer, winning the 1954 Acorn Stakes and running third in the Coaching Club American Oaks and Ladies Handicap. As a broodmare, Riverina produced good handicaper Rio Bravo, who became a sire of Classic winners in Brazil

The last half of Bee Mac’s producing career was steady, if not spectacular. Bred back again to Bimelech and *Princequillo, she also met Citation and Middleground. The foals of these meetings were average. Her last foal, a colt names Boyar,was born in 1961, when Bee Mac was 20

On a final note, here in an interesting tidbit. Bee Mac was the first foal sired by War Admiral. The last of Admiral’s foals was the filly Belthazar, who was out of the mare Blinking Owl, a half-sister to Bee Mac through their dam Baba Kenny. 

12AM
Bee Mac, the “dancing daughter of War Admiral”, skips through the mud to claim the 1943 Hopeful Stakes at Belmont Park. Three lengths behind her comes United States Hotel Stakes winner Boy Knight, and in third was Bee Mac’s stablemate By Jimminy, winner of the Grand Union Hotel Stakes and the champion 3-year-old of 1944. 
It was the first time in 29 years that a filly had won the prestigious Hopeful, the last before her being Regret in 1914. Furthermore, she won so impressively that many in the media thought it  thoroughly overshadowed Princequillo's record-setting victory in the Saratoga Cup the same day.  ”Practically running off and hiding from 11 rivals”, Bee Mac wired the field of juvenile colts, and was never asked. 

Bee Mac, the “dancing daughter of War Admiral”, skips through the mud to claim the 1943 Hopeful Stakes at Belmont Park. Three lengths behind her comes United States Hotel Stakes winner Boy Knight, and in third was Bee Mac’s stablemate By Jimminy, winner of the Grand Union Hotel Stakes and the champion 3-year-old of 1944. 

It was the first time in 29 years that a filly had won the prestigious Hopeful, the last before her being Regret in 1914. Furthermore, she won so impressively that many in the media thought it  thoroughly overshadowed Princequillo's record-setting victory in the Saratoga Cup the same day.  ”Practically running off and hiding from 11 rivals”, Bee Mac wired the field of juvenile colts, and was never asked. 

July242014
October 20, 1923 - Belmont Park
Two-time American champion and eventual Hall of Fame member Zev, with legendary jockey Earl Sande up, waits patiently for the start of his match race with Epsom Derby winner Papyrus
The race itself, known as “The International”, was unique for it’s time. It marked the first time that an Epsom Derby winner had faced a Kentucky Derby winner, and it was the first time that a major European horse had crossed to America for a match race. Promoters of the event went all out for it, charging seven times the normal ticket price, and selling the rights to film the race to Pathe for a reported $50,000
The hype worked, and fans turned out in plenty. It was not a full house, the bad weather and high ticket prices driving some away, but the infield was packed. The track itself was a sea of mud, but some eager fans had camped out since the early morning 
As for the race, it was generally accepted to have been disappointing. Many British fans felt that their horse was at a huge disadvantage following his transatlantic voyage, combined with the fact that he had never raced on dirt before. Further, Papyrus had been equipped with ordinary racing plates, while Zev wore special “mud caulks”. Predictably, Zev skipped over the track to win by five lengths, while Papyrus struggled miserably through the stretch. 
In another remarkable first, fans who had missed the race in person were able to view the film in theaters, some as soon as the next day. Pathe had set up 30 cameras around the track, and they edited the film the evening following the race.The first official showing of the film took place in New York on Sunday evening, and it was soon distributed worldwide. (The entire 20-minute film can viewed here)
The First International was a triumph for the American horse, but all agreed that it was not a true test. In the words of sports writer N. W. Baxter: “This was a triumph, but it was not the sort of thing to bring men’s hearts into their mouths, not make their spirits rise. The contest lived up to neither expectations nor the occasion”

October 20, 1923 - Belmont Park

Two-time American champion and eventual Hall of Fame member Zev, with legendary jockey Earl Sande up, waits patiently for the start of his match race with Epsom Derby winner Papyrus

The race itself, known as “The International”, was unique for it’s time. It marked the first time that an Epsom Derby winner had faced a Kentucky Derby winner, and it was the first time that a major European horse had crossed to America for a match race. Promoters of the event went all out for it, charging seven times the normal ticket price, and selling the rights to film the race to Pathe for a reported $50,000

The hype worked, and fans turned out in plenty. It was not a full house, the bad weather and high ticket prices driving some away, but the infield was packed. The track itself was a sea of mud, but some eager fans had camped out since the early morning 

As for the race, it was generally accepted to have been disappointing. Many British fans felt that their horse was at a huge disadvantage following his transatlantic voyage, combined with the fact that he had never raced on dirt before. Further, Papyrus had been equipped with ordinary racing plates, while Zev wore special “mud caulks”. Predictably, Zev skipped over the track to win by five lengths, while Papyrus struggled miserably through the stretch. 

In another remarkable first, fans who had missed the race in person were able to view the film in theaters, some as soon as the next day. Pathe had set up 30 cameras around the track, and they edited the film the evening following the race.The first official showing of the film took place in New York on Sunday evening, and it was soon distributed worldwide. (The entire 20-minute film can viewed here)

The First International was a triumph for the American horse, but all agreed that it was not a true test. In the words of sports writer N. W. Baxter: This was a triumph, but it was not the sort of thing to bring men’s hearts into their mouths, not make their spirits rise. The contest lived up to neither expectations nor the occasion”

3PM
3PM
4-year-old Brit-bred colt Malicious leads home the field of the 1965 Aqueduct Stakes. Directly behind him come lightly-regarded Pluck and 1965 Co-Horse of the Year Roman Brother.
The Aqueduct Stakes was meant to be the race that finally pushed 8-year-old gelding Kelso over the $2 million mark in earnings. Instead, Kelso “was never in contention”, and finished fourth. It was only the ninth time in 61 races that Kelso had finished out of the money.

4-year-old Brit-bred colt Malicious leads home the field of the 1965 Aqueduct Stakes. Directly behind him come lightly-regarded Pluck and 1965 Co-Horse of the Year Roman Brother.

The Aqueduct Stakes was meant to be the race that finally pushed 8-year-old gelding Kelso over the $2 million mark in earnings. Instead, Kelso “was never in contention”, and finished fourth. It was only the ninth time in 61 races that Kelso had finished out of the money.

2PM
Dominator, a colt from the second crop of Secretariat, stretches his legs

Dominator, a colt from the second crop of Secretariat, stretches his legs

2PM

R.I.P. Dance With Fate

So, so sad to hear about this one. Dance With Fate, in addition to being absolutely gorgeous, was a promising talent. His fatal accident occurred while he was in training for Saturday’s San Diego Handicap, in which he was to face older horses. We will never know the full extent of what he could have done, but we will always remember this beautiful, brave boy

Trainer Peter Eurton: “Words can’t express what we’re feeling right now. With an extremely heavy heart, we report Dance With Fate was unable to survive his injuries.”

July232014
Being born in the same year as a legend of the sport is a tough lot for a young horse. The year 1945 was especially bad, with the coming of both Citation and Coaltown, but it was in that year that a blaze-faced, long-legged chestnut colt named Billings was born 
Billings was bred by R. W. McIlvain, and born on his Walmac Farm in late March, 1945. He was immediately a standout, both for his pedigree and striking good looks. Sired by Epsom Derby winner *Mahmoud and out of a maiden *Sir Gallahad III mare named Native Gal, his pedigree included at least five stallions which had led the sire lists in America. Though his immediate distaff line was unimpressive, his third dam had been a Classic-level racer in France in the early 1920’s.
In July of 1946, the yearling Billings was given into the care of Hunter Moody, a Lexington trainer specializing in trotters, in the belief that breaking a young colt under harness “improves his disposition and his manners, and…develops a good mouth.” There he stayed for a month before he began his race training with trainer Howard “Babe” Wells.
Mr. McIlvain was an owner who hated to push his juveniles too much, and this was no exception. What little there was of Billings’ juvenile season occurred entirely in Chicago in the last half of July, 1947. He made his debut as the favorite in a maiden race at Arlington on July 18, but he finished second after a slow start. His next race was much improved, and he cantered to a six-length score on July 23. In his final two-year-old race, the Elementary Stakes at Washington Park, he was outdistanced by an up-and-comer named Citation, though he did beat future Santa Anita Derby winner Salmagundi for second
Billings’ brief season, where he never finished worse than second and had competed well in stakes company, convinced his owner that he was a quality colt. In the interim between ‘47 and ‘48, Billings was sent to Columbia to begin spring preparations under Max Hirsch, though it was well understood that the colt would be returned to Wells in the spring. Both Hirsch and McIlvain, who frequently visited his budding star, had high opinions of the handsome colt 
Billings made his season debut on April 10, a six-furlong a Keeneland, and he was the favorite. That he won was not singularly impressive, given that the rest of the field consisted mostly of maidens and claimers, but his time of 1:11 1/5 was considered a good clip. After this, it was on to his first stakes race of the year, the Blue Grass. Just as in the Elementary Stakes the year before, Billings was again helpless against a “Calumet Comet”, this time in the form of Coaltown. He “ran second most of the way, and finished there”. He was nearly three lengths ahead of hardy stakes-winning gelding Shy Guy, and Coaltown had run a track record for the nine furlongs.
Billings next met both Citation and Coaltown, as well as other stars of the track, in the Kentucky Derby. Pinched back at the start, Billings nevertheless moved up through the field until there were only three horses in front of him. He was unable to reel them in, however, and he finished a respectable fourth behind Citation, Coaltown, and My Request. Directly after the Derby, he was entered in the Crete Handicap at the Lincoln Fields meet at Washington Park, and there he threw in an uncharacteristic clunker, ending up seventh. 
Following these three losses, Billing then won two straight. He started by winning a mile allowance on May 22, in which he beat future Classic winner Papa Redbird. That was a prep race for the 1 1/8 miles Peabody Memorial, nine days later. Coupled with Eagle Look, and sent off at 2-5, Billing scored his first stakes victory. He sat off the pace and went after the leaders on the stretch turn, gained the lead in mid-stretch, and then held off a late rally by Shy Guy to win by 3/4 lengths. 
His next race was more than a month later, and this was a six-furlong allowance at Arlington. He was the favorite, but it was not his preferred distance, and he faded back to seventh after bleeding in the stretch. The bleeding kept him out of training, and again put a gap in his season.
Billings made his best grab at greatness at the Hawthorne meeting in September 1948. His long absence from the track saw him start at 16-1 for his return race, the Hawthorne Speed Handicap, on September 11. It was a thrilling battle, with Billings sitting back in mid-pack and making a late charge to beat good stakes performer Carrarra Marble by a neck, despite giving him seven pounds. 
A week later, Billings started in the Hawthorne Season Handicap, at 1 1/16 miles. Carrying 116 and giving everything in the field weight by scale, he dogged the lead of California Derby winner May Reward, then “ran over him and won easily by five lengths.” Future champion sprinter Delegate was in third.
In keeping with his steady rise in quality, his next race was his biggest. The 1945 Hawthorne Gold Cup boated a field including veteran gelding Sun Herod, Argentinean import Colosal, and Hollywood Gold Cup winning mare Happy Issue (it ought to be noted that Happy Issue was well past her prime at this point, being 8 years old). Carrying 122 pounds, Billings was away slowly. With a quarter-mile to go, he “came fast under pressure to yoke the leading Happy Issue”, and went away to win by 1 1/4 lengths from Sun Herod. Happy Issue, who had “swerved out under punishment” in the stretch, finished third but was disqualified to fourth for interference. 
Running his fourth race at Hawthorne, Billings nearly went undefeated. In the Charles W. Bidwell Memorial Handicap, he carried 128 pounds against Sun Herod, carrying 126. Billings “caught and brought down” Sun Herod in the stretch, but he was passed by the unheralded gelding Oration, who won by a nose. Jockey Mel Peterson, on Billings, lodged a claim of foul after the race, saying that Oration had lugged in on Billings in the stretch. The claim was disallowed
Billings was quick to recover from this loss, and on the last day of the meet, he took the Illinois Owners Handicap. He was eligible for the race because McIlvain was a legal resident of Illinois, but that clause eliminated most of the competition. He carried 128 pounds and was the 1-2 favorite, and he won “under a light hold” by 1 3/4 lengths
Billings was retired at the end of 1948, at sent to Spendthrift Farm for stud. His first major winner, the colt Midafternoon, came from his second crop. Midafternoon was a stakes winner at 4 and 5, and his biggest claim to fame was defeating Nashua in the 1956 Metropolitan Handicap. Jockos Walk, from his fourth crop, was another stakes winner, mostly at Jamaica in the late 1950’s. From a later crop came good steeplechaser Gramatam

Being born in the same year as a legend of the sport is a tough lot for a young horse. The year 1945 was especially bad, with the coming of both Citation and Coaltown, but it was in that year that a blaze-faced, long-legged chestnut colt named Billings was born 

Billings was bred by R. W. McIlvain, and born on his Walmac Farm in late March, 1945. He was immediately a standout, both for his pedigree and striking good looks. Sired by Epsom Derby winner *Mahmoud and out of a maiden *Sir Gallahad III mare named Native Gal, his pedigree included at least five stallions which had led the sire lists in America. Though his immediate distaff line was unimpressive, his third dam had been a Classic-level racer in France in the early 1920’s.

In July of 1946, the yearling Billings was given into the care of Hunter Moody, a Lexington trainer specializing in trotters, in the belief that breaking a young colt under harness “improves his disposition and his manners, and…develops a good mouth.” There he stayed for a month before he began his race training with trainer Howard “Babe” Wells.

Mr. McIlvain was an owner who hated to push his juveniles too much, and this was no exception. What little there was of Billings’ juvenile season occurred entirely in Chicago in the last half of July, 1947. He made his debut as the favorite in a maiden race at Arlington on July 18, but he finished second after a slow start. His next race was much improved, and he cantered to a six-length score on July 23. In his final two-year-old race, the Elementary Stakes at Washington Park, he was outdistanced by an up-and-comer named Citation, though he did beat future Santa Anita Derby winner Salmagundi for second

Billings’ brief season, where he never finished worse than second and had competed well in stakes company, convinced his owner that he was a quality colt. In the interim between ‘47 and ‘48, Billings was sent to Columbia to begin spring preparations under Max Hirsch, though it was well understood that the colt would be returned to Wells in the spring. Both Hirsch and McIlvain, who frequently visited his budding star, had high opinions of the handsome colt 

Billings made his season debut on April 10, a six-furlong a Keeneland, and he was the favorite. That he won was not singularly impressive, given that the rest of the field consisted mostly of maidens and claimers, but his time of 1:11 1/5 was considered a good clip. After this, it was on to his first stakes race of the year, the Blue Grass. Just as in the Elementary Stakes the year before, Billings was again helpless against a “Calumet Comet”, this time in the form of Coaltown. He “ran second most of the way, and finished there”. He was nearly three lengths ahead of hardy stakes-winning gelding Shy Guy, and Coaltown had run a track record for the nine furlongs.

Billings next met both Citation and Coaltown, as well as other stars of the track, in the Kentucky Derby. Pinched back at the start, Billings nevertheless moved up through the field until there were only three horses in front of him. He was unable to reel them in, however, and he finished a respectable fourth behind Citation, Coaltown, and My Request. Directly after the Derby, he was entered in the Crete Handicap at the Lincoln Fields meet at Washington Park, and there he threw in an uncharacteristic clunker, ending up seventh. 

Following these three losses, Billing then won two straight. He started by winning a mile allowance on May 22, in which he beat future Classic winner Papa Redbird. That was a prep race for the 1 1/8 miles Peabody Memorial, nine days later. Coupled with Eagle Look, and sent off at 2-5, Billing scored his first stakes victory. He sat off the pace and went after the leaders on the stretch turn, gained the lead in mid-stretch, and then held off a late rally by Shy Guy to win by 3/4 lengths. 

His next race was more than a month later, and this was a six-furlong allowance at Arlington. He was the favorite, but it was not his preferred distance, and he faded back to seventh after bleeding in the stretch. The bleeding kept him out of training, and again put a gap in his season.

Billings made his best grab at greatness at the Hawthorne meeting in September 1948. His long absence from the track saw him start at 16-1 for his return race, the Hawthorne Speed Handicap, on September 11. It was a thrilling battle, with Billings sitting back in mid-pack and making a late charge to beat good stakes performer Carrarra Marble by a neck, despite giving him seven pounds. 

A week later, Billings started in the Hawthorne Season Handicap, at 1 1/16 miles. Carrying 116 and giving everything in the field weight by scale, he dogged the lead of California Derby winner May Reward, then “ran over him and won easily by five lengths.” Future champion sprinter Delegate was in third.

In keeping with his steady rise in quality, his next race was his biggest. The 1945 Hawthorne Gold Cup boated a field including veteran gelding Sun Herod, Argentinean import Colosal, and Hollywood Gold Cup winning mare Happy Issue (it ought to be noted that Happy Issue was well past her prime at this point, being 8 years old). Carrying 122 pounds, Billings was away slowly. With a quarter-mile to go, he “came fast under pressure to yoke the leading Happy Issue”, and went away to win by 1 1/4 lengths from Sun Herod. Happy Issue, who had “swerved out under punishment” in the stretch, finished third but was disqualified to fourth for interference. 

Running his fourth race at Hawthorne, Billings nearly went undefeated. In the Charles W. Bidwell Memorial Handicap, he carried 128 pounds against Sun Herod, carrying 126. Billings “caught and brought down” Sun Herod in the stretch, but he was passed by the unheralded gelding Oration, who won by a nose. Jockey Mel Peterson, on Billings, lodged a claim of foul after the race, saying that Oration had lugged in on Billings in the stretch. The claim was disallowed

Billings was quick to recover from this loss, and on the last day of the meet, he took the Illinois Owners Handicap. He was eligible for the race because McIlvain was a legal resident of Illinois, but that clause eliminated most of the competition. He carried 128 pounds and was the 1-2 favorite, and he won “under a light hold” by 1 3/4 lengths

Billings was retired at the end of 1948, at sent to Spendthrift Farm for stud. His first major winner, the colt Midafternoon, came from his second crop. Midafternoon was a stakes winner at 4 and 5, and his biggest claim to fame was defeating Nashua in the 1956 Metropolitan Handicap. Jockos Walk, from his fourth crop, was another stakes winner, mostly at Jamaica in the late 1950’s. From a later crop came good steeplechaser Gramatam