August12014

Anonymous said: Why is War Emblem called gay?

image

Hehehehehehehehehehe

Anyways, War Emblem being “gay” (or being referred to as “Brokeback Emblem”) is a running joke in the racing/breeding community. Basically, War Emblem was sold to Japan after his retirement (it was hoped he would be a replacement for Sunday Silence), but when he got there…he refused to breed any mares. Like, at all. He got physically violent a few times, kicking and biting at any mares presented to him. He sired something like four or five foals during his first year. Thus, the running joke was that he was obviously gay - he had no interest in any mares 

The reality, though, was more psychological. After being evaluated by experts, he was moved further away from any other stallions on the barn and given his own harem of mares. The theory was that he was intimidated by the other stallions, and living only with his mares would boost his confidence. This seemed to work, and he began breeding more of the mares in his harem, but the next year he was back to his old habits. It’s a balancing act with him. It ought to be noted that he does have a “type” - he’s partial to smaller mares, and likes chestnuts above other colors

Despite the small number of them, War Emblem’s foals are proving him to be a potentially great sire. He had sired a number of stakes winners in Japan, including Classic winner Black Emblem, champion Robe Tissage, and multiple winners Civil War, King’s Emblem, and War Tactics

July312014
Lord Murphy, winner of the 1879 Kentucky Derby
The Tennessee-bred colt had no easy task of winning the Derby. He faced 8 opponents, including Falsetto, considered the best of their age group. Early in the race, Lord Murphy collided with the filly Ada Glenn, and was knocked nearly to his knees. His trainer, George Rice, was heard to exclaim “My critter’s gone!” in the stands. Lord Murphy, however, was a tougher critter than he was given credit for, and he rebounded to gain the lead. Falsetto made a furious late charge, but “could not catch the winner”. The winning time was 2:37, a record for the mile and a half that stood for seven years

Lord Murphy, winner of the 1879 Kentucky Derby

The Tennessee-bred colt had no easy task of winning the Derby. He faced 8 opponents, including Falsetto, considered the best of their age group. Early in the race, Lord Murphy collided with the filly Ada Glenn, and was knocked nearly to his knees. His trainer, George Rice, was heard to exclaim “My critter’s gone!” in the stands. Lord Murphy, however, was a tougher critter than he was given credit for, and he rebounded to gain the lead. Falsetto made a furious late charge, but “could not catch the winner”. The winning time was 2:37, a record for the mile and a half that stood for seven years

7PM

"So long as he had competition he would run like the wind. But as soon as he whipped everybody and got the lead, he would slow to a walk. He was a fire-eater when he had competition, though."

- Trainer “Sunny” Jim Fitzsimmons, on his Triple Crown winner Gallant Fox., who never won a race by more than four lengths. The combined margin of victory from Gallant Fox’s 11 career wins was only 20 lengths

"So long as he had competition he would run like the wind. But as soon as he whipped everybody and got the lead, he would slow to a walk. He was a fire-eater when he had competition, though."

- Trainer “Sunny” Jim Fitzsimmons, on his Triple Crown winner Gallant Fox., who never won a race by more than four lengths. The combined margin of victory from Gallant Fox’s 11 career wins was only 20 lengths

7PM
Exterminator - “A freight train with legs”
In a career that spanned eight years and 99 races, Exterminator hauled over six metric tons of combined weight - 12,580 1/2 pounds, to be exact. He won a record 35 stakes races, and was named Champion Handicap Horse three years in a row, in addition to being Horse of the Year in 1922
"(He was) the greatest all-around Thoroughbred in American racing history." - Colonel Matt J. Winn

Exterminator - “A freight train with legs”

In a career that spanned eight years and 99 races, Exterminator hauled over six metric tons of combined weight - 12,580 1/2 pounds, to be exact. He won a record 35 stakes races, and was named Champion Handicap Horse three years in a row, in addition to being Horse of the Year in 1922

"(He was) the greatest all-around Thoroughbred in American racing history." - Colonel Matt J. Winn

3AM

So me and my former roomie/best friend Lisa were going through some old papers…

And we found something special. A few years ago, us and some friends did that game where you all write a story one word at a time, and we wrote it down

Behold the glory!

Read More

2AM

"You tell people what business you’ve been in since 1934 and the first thing they ask is, ‘Did you ever win the Kentucky Derby?’ When you tell them ‘no’, they walk away. Now, I guess they won’t. If they ask."

- Trainer Charlie Whittingham, after Ferdinand's victory in the 1986 Kentucky Derby

"You tell people what business you’ve been in since 1934 and the first thing they ask is, ‘Did you ever win the Kentucky Derby?’ When you tell them ‘no’, they walk away. Now, I guess they won’t. If they ask."

- Trainer Charlie Whittingham, after Ferdinand's victory in the 1986 Kentucky Derby

2AM

rapturesrevenge:

pansexualityisperfect:

theuppitynegras:

you know what if my tax dollars are paying for this then I demand a turn

Imagine that soaring above a burning building like a waterfall UFO :P

afleetalexandra perfect way to see the races amirite?

The way I see it, you could get a bird’s eye view of the race, while at the same time sending down a pleasant cooling mist on all the sweaty jockeys and horses 

"Ahhhhhh!"

"Ahhhhhhhh!"

(Source: lolgifs.net)

1AM
Nellie Flag, the champion juvenile filly of 1934, held by trainer B. B. Williams, with Eddie Arcaro up 
A daughter of Man o’ War's first champion, American Flag, Nellie Flag was out of 1924 Preakness Stakes-winning filly Nellie Morse

Nellie Flag, the champion juvenile filly of 1934, held by trainer B. B. Williams, with Eddie Arcaro up 

A daughter of Man o’ War's first champion, American Flag, Nellie Flag was out of 1924 Preakness Stakes-winning filly Nellie Morse

1AM
July302014
November 3, 1956 - Flemington Racecourse, Melbourne, Australia
One of the rarest sights in horse racing, a triple dead heat occurred in the 1956 Hotham Handicap (now known as the Lexus Stakes). The winners were (left to right) Fighting Force, Ark Royal (a multiple stakes winner and important sire), and Pandie Sun 

November 3, 1956 - Flemington Racecourse, Melbourne, Australia

One of the rarest sights in horse racing, a triple dead heat occurred in the 1956 Hotham Handicap (now known as the Lexus Stakes). The winners were (left to right) Fighting Force, Ark Royal (a multiple stakes winner and important sire), and Pandie Sun 

July292014
10PM
1990’s Kentucky Derby winner and Champion 3-Year-Old colt Unbridled peeks out from his stall at Claiborne Farm, which bears the names of all the previous occupants: Bold Ruler, Secretariat, and Easy Goer

1990’s Kentucky Derby winner and Champion 3-Year-Old colt Unbridled peeks out from his stall at Claiborne Farm, which bears the names of all the previous occupants: Bold Ruler, Secretariat, and Easy Goer

12AM

"At first glance the small dark War Admiral did not seem to resemble his big red sire at all. Only the smouldering eye that flamed in the face of competition and the high, proud head showed any relationship. Yet of all Man o’ War's fine offspring this one, least like him in appearance, was most like him in performance. Nearly all the others would wait behind the pace and make their bid in the stretch. Only this small dark colt had speed both early and late, and liked to use it to the utmost. Both War Admiral and his sire were impatient at the restraint of the barrier and wanted to go to the front at once, pouring speed on speed until the opposition wilted.”

Illustrator and racing historian C.W. Anderson

July282014
The “Mighty Atom” and the “Flying Dutchman”
War Admiral and jockey Charley Kurtsinger, after winning the 1937 Preakness Stakes

The “Mighty Atom” and the “Flying Dutchman”

War Admiral and jockey Charley Kurtsinger, after winning the 1937 Preakness Stakes

11PM

"That under such circumstances, he should have run the record-making race he did was testimony of a gameness difficult to extol too highly."

War Admiral winning the 1937 Belmont Stakes, and Triple Crown, after cutting a sizable gash in his right front leg while stumbling at the start 

"That under such circumstances, he should have run the record-making race he did was testimony of a gameness difficult to extol too highly."

War Admiral winning the 1937 Belmont Stakes, and Triple Crown, after cutting a sizable gash in his right front leg while stumbling at the start