March62014
“It was awful. He jumped in the air and mounted the pony in broad daylight, with all the cameras on him. He had both of his legs wrapped around the pony girl. I had to jog (him) back to the barn by myself.” Exercise rider Pam Mabes, recalling the time an unsuspecting pony rider attempted to bring Kentucky Derby winner Sunday Silence back to his barn following a workout for the Preakness at Pimlico
8PM
Gabby’s Golden Gal
From the same Medaglia d’Oro crop as Rachel Alexandra, Gabby’s Golden Gal faced her half-sister in the 2009 Kentucky Oaks. After leading for most of the race, Gabby faded to sixth as Rachel went on to crushing victory
Gabby turned it around one month later when she won the Grade 1 Acorn Stakes at Belmont Park, leading from the start and holding off a late charge from Justwhistledixie. There followed two back-to-back losses in Grade 1 races. In the Prioress Stakes, also at Belmont, Gabby stumbled badly at the start and was never a factor, finishing last in the field of nine. Her last race of 2009 was a 7th-place finish in the La Brea Stakes at Santa Anita
2010 kicked off with a bang when Gabby won the Grade 1 Santa Monica Handicap by 1 1/4 lengths over British import *Proviso. She rounded out the year by finishing 10th in the Breeder’s Cup Filly and Mare Sprint
Gabby’s Golden Gal was sold to Shadai Farm in November of 2010 for $1.25 million. In 2012 she gave birth to her first foal, a colt sired by Shadai stallion Heart’s Cry

Gabby’s Golden Gal

From the same Medaglia d’Oro crop as Rachel Alexandra, Gabby’s Golden Gal faced her half-sister in the 2009 Kentucky Oaks. After leading for most of the race, Gabby faded to sixth as Rachel went on to crushing victory

Gabby turned it around one month later when she won the Grade 1 Acorn Stakes at Belmont Park, leading from the start and holding off a late charge from Justwhistledixie. There followed two back-to-back losses in Grade 1 races. In the Prioress Stakes, also at Belmont, Gabby stumbled badly at the start and was never a factor, finishing last in the field of nine. Her last race of 2009 was a 7th-place finish in the La Brea Stakes at Santa Anita

2010 kicked off with a bang when Gabby won the Grade 1 Santa Monica Handicap by 1 1/4 lengths over British import *Proviso. She rounded out the year by finishing 10th in the Breeder’s Cup Filly and Mare Sprint

Gabby’s Golden Gal was sold to Shadai Farm in November of 2010 for $1.25 million. In 2012 she gave birth to her first foal, a colt sired by Shadai stallion Heart’s Cry

8PM
Greek Star
1955 grey colt by Heather Broom, out of Silver Queen
Greek Star was the son of two strong lines. His sire, Heather Broom, had won the 1939 Blue Grass Stakes and finished third in the Kentucky Derby. Dam Silver Queen was a grey daughter of Triple Crown winner War Admiral. Taking after his mother in looks, Greek Star had the talent of his sire
From his career 92 starts, the durable colt won a credible 18, including victories in the Massachusetts Governor’s Handicap, Quaker City Handicap, Sheepshead Bay Handicap, and New Orleans Handicap. He retired with nearly $300,000 in earnings 
Sire of minor stakes winners

Greek Star

1955 grey colt by Heather Broom, out of Silver Queen

Greek Star was the son of two strong lines. His sire, Heather Broom, had won the 1939 Blue Grass Stakes and finished third in the Kentucky Derby. Dam Silver Queen was a grey daughter of Triple Crown winner War Admiral. Taking after his mother in looks, Greek Star had the talent of his sire

From his career 92 starts, the durable colt won a credible 18, including victories in the Massachusetts Governor’s Handicap, Quaker City Handicap, Sheepshead Bay Handicap, and New Orleans Handicap. He retired with nearly $300,000 in earnings 

Sire of minor stakes winners

7PM

"There was always something of a leaping flame about the son of Hastings and Fairy Gold, the effect of his flashing golden coat, his eager, agile movement, his disdain of familiarity, his lofty head and fiery spirit, unquenched to the last…Everything about Fair Play was balanced and proportionate and harmonious. It was the justness and poise of his physique which excited the admiration of the connoisseur.”

-John Hervey

March42014
6PM
13-year-old mare Home Court with her newborn Union Rags filly
Sweet <3

13-year-old mare Home Court with her newborn Union Rags filly

Sweet <3

March32014
racinglegends:

toosonny:

Cigar is easily my favorite thoroughbred gelding, a close second is Funny Cide who I also saw. 

He is fertile. Not a gelding. 


He is, in fact, neither a gelding nor fertile. Cigar is an infertile stallion.

racinglegends:

toosonny:

Cigar is easily my favorite thoroughbred gelding, a close second is Funny Cide who I also saw. 

He is fertile. Not a gelding. 

He is, in fact, neither a gelding nor fertile. Cigar is an infertile stallion.

(via myfatherisalumberjack)

March22014
Gorgeous Pair!
Here&#8217;s an update on champion mare Danedream and her little Frankel filly, looking beautiful today at Newsells Park Stud
(Photo by Chris Grassick)

Gorgeous Pair!

Here’s an update on champion mare Danedream and her little Frankel filly, looking beautiful today at Newsells Park Stud

(Photo by Chris Grassick)

6PM
In further Barbaro family news, full brother Nicanor was represented by his first foal last night, when 9-year-old mare My Little Josie foaled this strapping filly at Shamrock Farm

In further Barbaro family news, full brother Nicanor was represented by his first foal last night, when 9-year-old mare My Little Josie foaled this strapping filly at Shamrock Farm

6PM

It’s a Boy!

Freshman stallion Lentenor, full brother to Barbaro, was represented by his first foal late last month. 8-year-old mare Smoke’m Over, herself a half-sister to the dam of millionaire Switch, foaled a healthy colt on February 20 at Calumet Farm

5PM

Anonymous asked: What happens if a horse cross the wire with its feet in front of its nose? Do they use that to determine the time of the race? And do they look at the feet if a photo review is needed?

Feet are a non-issue; photo finishes are judged by noses

Reasons for this:

  • The nose almost always hits first anyway. That’s just because of the way (most) horses run, with the head and neck being in front of the front legs for most of their stride. When the front legs are fully extended, they may outreach the nose, or they may be even, or they may be shorter. It’s all to do with how long the neck and/or legs are. BUT through most of the stride the nose is in front, thus it’s the nose which hits the wire first most of the time
  • Even if the feet hit first, the nose is what counts. The way most photo finish cameras are designed, the image of the legs tend to be distorted, making them useless for deciding order of finish. The image of the legs is either elongated or truncated, depending on if they were moving forward or backwards when the picture was taken

Check out this picture of Black Caviar’s photo finish win in the 2012 Diamond Jubilee Stakes. Notice how her front leg is bent and shaped awkwardly

image

In America, we tend more toward the Teletimer cameras for photo finishes, which is better about the distortion, but it still happens:

image

(Check out the legs on #11 Fast Falcon up there. Yeesh!)

image

(That’s Blind Luck nosing out Evening Jewel for the 2010 Kentucky Oaks, and look at that weirdly bent front leg, still not in front of her nose)

image

(Afleet Express over Fly Down in the 2010 Travers)

One final one, just because I absolutely love the gigantic blurry tree trunk legs on some of these horses ><

image

(Look at #11’s back leg! And #6’s!) 

March12014
8PM

It’s the end of a wonderfully blessed racing career, and the beginning of a new one. He’s been a wonderful horse and he’ll be a wonderful stallion.”

- Breeder/Owner Arthur Hancock III, on the retirement of Sunday Silence. Hancock was correct. Standing in Japan, Sunday Silence became the world’s leading stallion by offspring earnings ($713,124,822)

7PM

K: &#8220;Put that black bastard away. God, that&#8217;s an awful weanling.&#8221;
L: &#8220;Well, Mr Keefer, roses will look mighty pretty on him one day. You never know.&#8221;
K: &#8220;The only time that son of a bitch will ever have a rose on him will be on his grave.&#8221;

- Conversation between adviser Ted Keefer and Stone Farm manager Pete Logan, regarding the weanling Sunday Silence 

K: “Put that black bastard away. God, that’s an awful weanling.”

L: “Well, Mr Keefer, roses will look mighty pretty on him one day. You never know.”

K: “The only time that son of a bitch will ever have a rose on him will be on his grave.”

- Conversation between adviser Ted Keefer and Stone Farm manager Pete Logan, regarding the weanling Sunday Silence 

7PM
Trainer Charlie Whittingham and his thirsty champion Sunday Silence 
Whittigham had probably the biggest hand in Sunday Silence&#8217;s success. The sickly foal was twice sent to auction and twice failed to meet his reserve price. On the return trip from one of the auctions, the van Sunday was traveling in overturned in a ditch, but he miraculously escaped with only minor scratches. He seemed destined for a life of obscurity, but Charlie Whittingham saw something special in the black colt. He bought a half-interest in Sunday (and later sold half of that to Dr Ernest Galliard). Breeder and partial owner Arthur Hancock III was still not convinced that the horse had a future. While watching Sunday exercise one morning, Whittingham made the remark &#8220;This black son of a bitch can run.&#8221; Coming from the reserved Whittingham, the remark convinced Hancock that Sunday Silence might just prove to be a decent racehorse

Trainer Charlie Whittingham and his thirsty champion Sunday Silence 

Whittigham had probably the biggest hand in Sunday Silence’s success. The sickly foal was twice sent to auction and twice failed to meet his reserve price. On the return trip from one of the auctions, the van Sunday was traveling in overturned in a ditch, but he miraculously escaped with only minor scratches. He seemed destined for a life of obscurity, but Charlie Whittingham saw something special in the black colt. He bought a half-interest in Sunday (and later sold half of that to Dr Ernest Galliard). Breeder and partial owner Arthur Hancock III was still not convinced that the horse had a future. While watching Sunday exercise one morning, Whittingham made the remark “This black son of a bitch can run.” Coming from the reserved Whittingham, the remark convinced Hancock that Sunday Silence might just prove to be a decent racehorse