August62014

Mr. Prospector attached his name to a breeding dynasty reminiscent of the one created by the brilliant, speed-producing stallion Domino a century ago. Domino’s influence in racing and breeding lasted well into the 20th century, and there is not a single doubt that Mr. Prospector’s influence as a stallion and broodmare sire will endure at the highest levels well into the next century.”

- David Schmitz, The Blood-Horse Magazine

2PM
Cochise Comes Home
4-year-old grey Cochise, a son of imported British stallion *Boswell, embarked on a grueling cross-country campaign in 1950. Starting at Jamaica in April, he visited Havre de Grace, Belmont, Suffolk Downs, Arlington, and Saratoga, racking up wins and near-misses along the way. But in the midst of his travels, he returned to his home track at Delaware Park for the $25,000 Sussex Handicap on June 17. Even Hollywood could not have imagined a more glorious homecoming 
Cochise was on a hot streak - he had “blown apart” the Massachusetts Handicap only weeks earlier, and that feat earned him the highweight of 125 pounds in the Sussex. His competition was good, the field including Whirlaway Stakes winner Curandero, defending Sussex champ (and stakes record holder) Flying Missel, and veteran handicapper Loser Weeper. With jockey Ovie Scurlock up, Cochise dominated the race. He rushed straight to the lead and “turned back repeated bids on the turn and throughout the stretch” to win by almost a length from Curandero, with Royal Governor third
(In photo: Cochise in front, behind comes {from the rail out} Curandero, Flying Missel, Double Brandy, and Loser Weeper)

Cochise Comes Home

4-year-old grey Cochise, a son of imported British stallion *Boswell, embarked on a grueling cross-country campaign in 1950. Starting at Jamaica in April, he visited Havre de Grace, Belmont, Suffolk Downs, Arlington, and Saratoga, racking up wins and near-misses along the way. But in the midst of his travels, he returned to his home track at Delaware Park for the $25,000 Sussex Handicap on June 17. Even Hollywood could not have imagined a more glorious homecoming 

Cochise was on a hot streak - he had “blown apart” the Massachusetts Handicap only weeks earlier, and that feat earned him the highweight of 125 pounds in the Sussex. His competition was good, the field including Whirlaway Stakes winner Curandero, defending Sussex champ (and stakes record holder) Flying Missel, and veteran handicapper Loser Weeper. With jockey Ovie Scurlock up, Cochise dominated the race. He rushed straight to the lead and “turned back repeated bids on the turn and throughout the stretch” to win by almost a length from Curandero, with Royal Governor third

(In photo: Cochise in front, behind comes {from the rail out} Curandero, Flying Missel, Double Brandy, and Loser Weeper)

1PM
August52014

Help me my Tumble friends!

Okay, so, the Christmas before last, I sent presents to some of my best Tumblr peeps. Mostly they consisted of a sorta collage-type thing and a bookmark of their favorite horse

I’ve lost track of who all I sent them to (however, I know Rapture, Zoe, and Mandy were definitely on the list), but if you did get one, can you do me a huge favor?

If you still have them (and I won’t be offended if you don’t), can you please send me some pictures of them? I should have taken some before I sent them, but I forgot >< Basically, I’m thinking of perhaps making them to sell, and I need pictures of them to sort of advertise (plus, I kinda forgot what they looked like lol)

ANYWAYS THANKS GUYS!

1PM
The distinctive splashed markings of Northern Taste
Racing in France and England during the 1970&#8217;s, Northern Taste was a Group 1 winning son of Northern Dancer. He was purchased as a yearling for $100,000 by Zenya Yoshida, and stood stud at Yoshida&#8217;s Shadai Stallion Station in Japan following his retirement. There he was 11 times the leading stallion
Northern Taste died in 2004, at the advanced age of 33

The distinctive splashed markings of Northern Taste

Racing in France and England during the 1970’s, Northern Taste was a Group 1 winning son of Northern Dancer. He was purchased as a yearling for $100,000 by Zenya Yoshida, and stood stud at Yoshida’s Shadai Stallion Station in Japan following his retirement. There he was 11 times the leading stallion

Northern Taste died in 2004, at the advanced age of 33

1PM
1988 Epsom, Irish, and Yorkshire Oaks winner Diminuendo with her first foal, a colt sired by Danzig
The little bay, later gelded and named Thunder Strike, was unplaced in six career starts

1988 Epsom, Irish, and Yorkshire Oaks winner Diminuendo with her first foal, a colt sired by Danzig

The little bay, later gelded and named Thunder Strike, was unplaced in six career starts

August42014
The unpredictable Whirlaway and his unfortunate jockey, Wendell Eads
Wendell Eads was &#8220;a talented youngster&#8221; in the early 1940&#8217;s, when he landed a contract to ride for the up-and-coming Calumet Farm. In 1941, he was given the dubious honor of piloting Calumet&#8217;s Kentucky Derby-bound speedster Whirlaway - dubious because Whirlaway was already infamous for his maddening &#8220;quirks&#8221;, which included rearing and jumping with no warning, ducking to the far outside of the track during races, and staying parked in the gate at the start. It was a less than ideal match. At 102 pounds, Eads was considered small even for a jockey, and he was physically unable to wrestle the headstrong chestnut into keeping a straight course. They won their first race together, but then lost two big ones - the Blue Grass and the Derby Trial Stakes. The latter race was run just four days before the Derby itself, and it was Eads&#8217; last chance. Whirlaway lost as the heavy favorite, and Eads was replaced with Eddie Arcaro, thus losing his chance to win the Triple Crown
Eads got back on Whirlaway for an overnight allowance at Belmont Park in the four-week hiatus between the 1941 Preakness and Belmont Stakes. Doing &#8220;a credible job in the saddle&#8221;, Eads managed to keep Whirlaway under control enough to win by 2&#160;1/4 lengths 

The unpredictable Whirlaway and his unfortunate jockey, Wendell Eads

Wendell Eads was “a talented youngster” in the early 1940’s, when he landed a contract to ride for the up-and-coming Calumet Farm. In 1941, he was given the dubious honor of piloting Calumet’s Kentucky Derby-bound speedster Whirlaway - dubious because Whirlaway was already infamous for his maddening “quirks”, which included rearing and jumping with no warning, ducking to the far outside of the track during races, and staying parked in the gate at the start. It was a less than ideal match. At 102 pounds, Eads was considered small even for a jockey, and he was physically unable to wrestle the headstrong chestnut into keeping a straight course. They won their first race together, but then lost two big ones - the Blue Grass and the Derby Trial Stakes. The latter race was run just four days before the Derby itself, and it was Eads’ last chance. Whirlaway lost as the heavy favorite, and Eads was replaced with Eddie Arcaro, thus losing his chance to win the Triple Crown

Eads got back on Whirlaway for an overnight allowance at Belmont Park in the four-week hiatus between the 1941 Preakness and Belmont Stakes. Doing “a credible job in the saddle”, Eads managed to keep Whirlaway under control enough to win by 2 1/4 lengths 

11PM
10PM

webuiltthepyramids:

twostarsandstripes:

What is the best way to NOT get Assault and Whirlaway mixed up when I recite the Triple Crown winners to myself? I ALWAYS have trouble remembering which of them come before the other.

Just remember the two Calumet Triple Crown winners weren’t right in a row?  I guess?

I always remember that Whirlaway came right after War Admiral, two W’s in a row. Assault was sandwiched between two C horses…so, closer to the beginning of the alphabet? I don’t know, it sounds more logical in my head XD

Or you could try:

Silvery-Grey Old Warriors Walk Calmly Around Countless Savages in Strange Armor

(I made that up forever ago to help me remember the names)  

8PM
1889 and 1890 Horse of the Year Salvator
Winner of 16 career races from 19 starts, including the 1890 Suburban Handicap and Monmouth Cup. Salvator had rivalries with two celebrated runners: Proctor Knott as a juvenile, and the &#8220;swaybacked&#8221; Tenny at three. He never defeated Proctor Knott, and he never lost to Tenny. In his final appearance on a racetrack, Salvator faced only the clock. Going a straight mile at Monmouth, he set an American record time of 1:35&#160;1/2 
Salvator was inducted into the Racing Hall of Fame in 1988

1889 and 1890 Horse of the Year Salvator

Winner of 16 career races from 19 starts, including the 1890 Suburban Handicap and Monmouth Cup. Salvator had rivalries with two celebrated runners: Proctor Knott as a juvenile, and the “swaybacked” Tenny at three. He never defeated Proctor Knott, and he never lost to Tenny. In his final appearance on a racetrack, Salvator faced only the clock. Going a straight mile at Monmouth, he set an American record time of 1:35 1/2 

Salvator was inducted into the Racing Hall of Fame in 1988

8PM
3-year-old Celt, a star often outshined by his stablemate Colin, is eased down approaching the finish of the 1908 Brooklyn Handicap at Gravesend 
The popular Celt was applauded by the then-record crowd of 25,000 during the post parade, and he &#8220;cantered past the grandstand looking the winner that he proved to be&#8221;. Although didn&#8217;t break well, Celt was in front by the half-mile, and &#8220;from that time to the finish he was never in danger.&#8221; Eased down, he won in stakes record time for the 1&#160;1/4 miles. It was only the second running of the Brooklyn, but Celt&#8217;s time was also a track record
Fair Play, the eternal rival, finished a game second, with Master Robert third. Fair Play had run second to Colin in the Belmont Stakes only two days prior to competing in the Brooklyn 

3-year-old Celt, a star often outshined by his stablemate Colin, is eased down approaching the finish of the 1908 Brooklyn Handicap at Gravesend 

The popular Celt was applauded by the then-record crowd of 25,000 during the post parade, and he “cantered past the grandstand looking the winner that he proved to be”. Although didn’t break well, Celt was in front by the half-mile, and “from that time to the finish he was never in danger.” Eased down, he won in stakes record time for the 1 1/4 miles. It was only the second running of the Brooklyn, but Celt’s time was also a track record

Fair Play, the eternal rival, finished a game second, with Master Robert third. Fair Play had run second to Colin in the Belmont Stakes only two days prior to competing in the Brooklyn 

7PM
12PM

Jess’s Dream (aka Taco) had his first turn around the Saratoga track this morning! Both of his parents won the Gr1 Woodward Stakes there, so hopefully he takes to it also

(Photos from NYRA Facebook page)

August32014

startinggate:

Sweet Reason came running late to win her third lifetime G1 race in the Test Stakes (I).

This would be a filly with a future. Hopefully. We seem to be running dry on older ladies being awesome lately…

(via myfatherisalumberjack)

8PM
Three-year-old Sham leads the post parade for the 1973 Santa Anita Derby, followed by stablemate Knightly Dawn
In one of the greatest performances of his sadly abbreviated career, Sham pulled off a surprise victory over 1-2 favorite Linda&#8217;s Chief. Proving himself to be one of the fastest horses of the 20th century, he equaled the Santa Anita Derby record set by Lucky Debonair in 1965. The time, 1:47 flat for nine furlongs, has been equaled once since, but never bested 

Three-year-old Sham leads the post parade for the 1973 Santa Anita Derby, followed by stablemate Knightly Dawn

In one of the greatest performances of his sadly abbreviated career, Sham pulled off a surprise victory over 1-2 favorite Linda’s Chief. Proving himself to be one of the fastest horses of the 20th century, he equaled the Santa Anita Derby record set by Lucky Debonair in 1965. The time, 1:47 flat for nine furlongs, has been equaled once since, but never bested