June72014
5PM
19-year-old mare New Pin, dam of multiple stakes winner Cochise, with her 1951 Firethorn filly
Eventually greying out like her mother, the filly was named Greythorn. She was a non-winner in one career start and produced only four non-winning foals at stud  

19-year-old mare New Pin, dam of multiple stakes winner Cochise, with her 1951 Firethorn filly

Eventually greying out like her mother, the filly was named Greythorn. She was a non-winner in one career start and produced only four non-winning foals at stud  

5PM
"Sunny" Jim Fitzsimmons celebrates his 77th birthday at Monmouth Park in 1951, with jockey Jimmy Stout looking on 

"Sunny" Jim Fitzsimmons celebrates his 77th birthday at Monmouth Park in 1951, with jockey Jimmy Stout looking on 

4PM

Holy shit they actually managed to mention the other horses in the field!

I’m honestly surprised. I figured we were gonna get to post time with nary a look at any of the other entrants. 

Course, now that we’ve looked at them once, they’re free to go back to two solid hours of “LOOK HOW AMAZING CHROME IS THERE’S NO DOUBT HE’S GONNA WIN HERE LET STEVE CAUTHEN TELL YOU ABOUT HOW HE’S GONNA WIN AND LET’S REPLAY EVERY ONE OF HIS RACES AT LEAST 15 TIMES EACH AND TALK ABOUT HOW AWESOME HE IS IN THEM AND HOW THAT MEANS HE’S GONNA WIN AND HERE’S RANDOM CELEBRITIES WHO DON’T EVEN KNOW WHAT A TRIPLE CROWN IS TELL YOU ABOUT HOW THEY WANT HIM TO WIN!”

I’m keeping a running count and so far I’ve heard “California Chrome” 57 times in the last 20 minutes. I’m about to put it on mute.

Oh, and let’s all applaud how they’ve started referring to the other competitors as the “villains” of today’s race. That’s just so, so classy 

June32014
4PM
The “Gray Ghost of Chile” Olhaverry, a top-class racer in the late 1940’s who defeated both Assault and Armed in the 1947 Santa Anita Handicap
One of the first horses imported from Chile to race in America, Olhaverry predicted the later success of Cougar II, Babu, Stravina, Tizna, Infinidad, Miss Brio, Host, and Malek (to name just a few!)

The “Gray Ghost of Chile” Olhaverry, a top-class racer in the late 1940’s who defeated both Assault and Armed in the 1947 Santa Anita Handicap

One of the first horses imported from Chile to race in America, Olhaverry predicted the later success of Cougar II, Babu, Stravina, Tizna, Infinidad, Miss Brio, Host, and Malek (to name just a few!)

3PM
afleetalexandra:

goforbold:

The gorgeous Noor frolics in his paddock.

Noor was a beast. If you don’t know Noor, I feel bad for you son
He had 99 problems but Citation wasn’t one

afleetalexandra:

goforbold:

The gorgeous Noor frolics in his paddock.

Noor was a beast. If you don’t know Noor, I feel bad for you son

He had 99 problems but Citation wasn’t one

(Source: youtube.com)

3PM
June12014
Jamaica Park bids a fond farewell to 8-year-old Stymie at the end of his storied racing career
On November 5, 1949, Stymie was honored with a special retirement parade at the site of his very first start. It was actually his second “retirement”, as he had also been put to pasture in mid-1948. He was brought back in 1949 to attempt to become racing’s first millionaire, but he was unable to win any races and re-retired at the end of the year. Two years later, Citation achieved that feat while winning the 1951 Hollywood Gold Cup

Jamaica Park bids a fond farewell to 8-year-old Stymie at the end of his storied racing career

On November 5, 1949, Stymie was honored with a special retirement parade at the site of his very first start. It was actually his second “retirement”, as he had also been put to pasture in mid-1948. He was brought back in 1949 to attempt to become racing’s first millionaire, but he was unable to win any races and re-retired at the end of the year. Two years later, Citation achieved that feat while winning the 1951 Hollywood Gold Cup

7PM
It was a hard-fought battle and close at the end, but Gaffery (center) was the eventual winner of the 1948 Ladies Handicap at Belmont. Champion 3-Year-Old Filly Miss Request is barely seen on the inside, while flashy gray Adile is a fast-closing third on the outside

It was a hard-fought battle and close at the end, but Gaffery (center) was the eventual winner of the 1948 Ladies Handicap at Belmont. Champion 3-Year-Old Filly Miss Request is barely seen on the inside, while flashy gray Adile is a fast-closing third on the outside

May312014
"Hello, little one"
(Circa 1940’s)

"Hello, little one"

(Circa 1940’s)

7PM
Speedy little Miss Kimo, as she looked as a juvenile 
Although generally ranked below tougher But Why Not and the faster First Flight, Miss Kimo was at one point thought to be best filly of 1947. She was a lanky daughter of successful racer and even more successful sire Hash, and her dam was a granddaughter of undefeated legend Colin. Running toward the skinny side as a juvenile, she nevertheless possessed speed to spare 
In 1945, Miss Kimo was sold for $4,700 at the Keeneland Summer Yearling Sale to oilman William G Helis, Jr. She carried his colors to the races the nest year, kicking off her racing career in mid-1946. She was an almost immediate success, winning one division of the $25,000 Pollyanna Stakes in July. She followed that with wins in the Polly Drummond and Rosedale Stakes, before meeting her first defeat in the $10,000 Fashion Stakes at Belmont. Though beaten only a half-length, Miss Kimo was clearly second best to First Flight, who equaled the track record in winning her first race. When the two met again in the Astoria Stakes a month later, it was much the same. Miss Kimo, a veteran of four races, carried the topweight of 122 pounds over First Flight, who was making only her second start. The extra experience didn’t help; First Flight skipped to a three-length victory with Kiss Kimo 1 1/2 lengths ahead of third-placed Dark Venus
In early August, Helis’ filly tried the six-furlong Schuylerville Stakes at Saratoga. Favored in the betting and carrying the co-top weight (with Pippette) Miss Kimo was a miserably beaten 9th while Bright Song won by two. It wasn’t until late September that she would win another big race. That was at Atlantic City, where she took the $15,000 King Neptune Stakes over Repand. At year’s end, it was the speedy First Flight who claimed championship honors 
Filling out over the winter, Miss Kimo was one of the top 3-year-old fillies of 1947. She missed out on winning the $25,000 Modesty Stakes on July 1, but regained her form quickly. Only six days later, she put on a spectacular performance to win the Cleopatra Handicap at Arlington. Carrying the topweight of 120 pounds, Miss Kimo’s determined final rush carried her past Canadian Hall of Fame member Casa Camara in the last 50 yards
On August 3, Miss Kimo once again carried the topweight to victory, this time in the prestigious Artful Handicap at Washington Park. After stalking pace-setting Ocean Brief almost throughout, Miss Kimo passed her in the stretch and extended her margin to just over a length. Eleven days later, she boosted her reputation with another powerful performance, this time in the Misty Isle Stakes. Breaking on top and staying there, Miss Kimo won the seven furlong race in track record time, breaking the record held by Twilight Tear 
Perhaps Miss Kimo’s finest race came in October 1947, when she won the Correction Handicap at Jamaica. As usual, she carried the topweight, this time 126 pounds. Among those in the field were former champion juvenile fillies Beaugay and First Flight, as well as good stakes mare Miss Disco. None of it mattered at all to Miss Kimo, who came from third place around the final turn to win by a length
Miss Kimo was kept in training and occasionally raced at four, her glory days were behind her. She was eventually retired to broodmare duties, being first bred in 1951. Six registered foals followed, five of them fillies. Her first daughter, School Marm, became a top-notch broodmare in Puerto Rico, where she produced four stakes winners. Her second daughter, Kimmer, was the dam of 1965 Arizona Derby winner Parking Ticket

Speedy little Miss Kimo, as she looked as a juvenile 

Although generally ranked below tougher But Why Not and the faster First Flight, Miss Kimo was at one point thought to be best filly of 1947. She was a lanky daughter of successful racer and even more successful sire Hash, and her dam was a granddaughter of undefeated legend Colin. Running toward the skinny side as a juvenile, she nevertheless possessed speed to spare 

In 1945, Miss Kimo was sold for $4,700 at the Keeneland Summer Yearling Sale to oilman William G Helis, Jr. She carried his colors to the races the nest year, kicking off her racing career in mid-1946. She was an almost immediate success, winning one division of the $25,000 Pollyanna Stakes in July. She followed that with wins in the Polly Drummond and Rosedale Stakes, before meeting her first defeat in the $10,000 Fashion Stakes at Belmont. Though beaten only a half-length, Miss Kimo was clearly second best to First Flight, who equaled the track record in winning her first race. When the two met again in the Astoria Stakes a month later, it was much the same. Miss Kimo, a veteran of four races, carried the topweight of 122 pounds over First Flight, who was making only her second start. The extra experience didn’t help; First Flight skipped to a three-length victory with Kiss Kimo 1 1/2 lengths ahead of third-placed Dark Venus

In early August, Helis’ filly tried the six-furlong Schuylerville Stakes at Saratoga. Favored in the betting and carrying the co-top weight (with Pippette) Miss Kimo was a miserably beaten 9th while Bright Song won by two. It wasn’t until late September that she would win another big race. That was at Atlantic City, where she took the $15,000 King Neptune Stakes over Repand. At year’s end, it was the speedy First Flight who claimed championship honors 

Filling out over the winter, Miss Kimo was one of the top 3-year-old fillies of 1947. She missed out on winning the $25,000 Modesty Stakes on July 1, but regained her form quickly. Only six days later, she put on a spectacular performance to win the Cleopatra Handicap at Arlington. Carrying the topweight of 120 pounds, Miss Kimo’s determined final rush carried her past Canadian Hall of Fame member Casa Camara in the last 50 yards

On August 3, Miss Kimo once again carried the topweight to victory, this time in the prestigious Artful Handicap at Washington Park. After stalking pace-setting Ocean Brief almost throughout, Miss Kimo passed her in the stretch and extended her margin to just over a length. Eleven days later, she boosted her reputation with another powerful performance, this time in the Misty Isle Stakes. Breaking on top and staying there, Miss Kimo won the seven furlong race in track record time, breaking the record held by Twilight Tear 

Perhaps Miss Kimo’s finest race came in October 1947, when she won the Correction Handicap at Jamaica. As usual, she carried the topweight, this time 126 pounds. Among those in the field were former champion juvenile fillies Beaugay and First Flight, as well as good stakes mare Miss Disco. None of it mattered at all to Miss Kimo, who came from third place around the final turn to win by a length

Miss Kimo was kept in training and occasionally raced at four, her glory days were behind her. She was eventually retired to broodmare duties, being first bred in 1951. Six registered foals followed, five of them fillies. Her first daughter, School Marm, became a top-notch broodmare in Puerto Rico, where she produced four stakes winners. Her second daughter, Kimmer, was the dam of 1965 Arizona Derby winner Parking Ticket

4PM
 A one-of-a-kind group shot!
Left to right: Citation (1948 Triple Crown winner), Coaltown (1949 Horse of the Year/Champion Sprinter), Armed (1947 Horse of the Year), and Ponder (1949 Kentucky Derby winner)

 A one-of-a-kind group shot!

Left to right: Citation (1948 Triple Crown winner), Coaltown (1949 Horse of the Year/Champion Sprinter), Armed (1947 Horse of the Year), and Ponder (1949 Kentucky Derby winner)

May272014

Stakes winning mare Land O Liberty with her second foal, a filly sired by Rough’N Tumble, at Ocala in 1960

The filly was later named Grand Union, and while she was disappointing on the track, she produced the stakes winner Gin-Rob in 1965

8PM
October 22, 1945
Equine history was in progress as El Lobo and Featherfoot became the very first Thoroughbreds to be transported by airplane. In a twin-engine Budd transport plane, the pair left from Los Angeles and landed safely in the parking area at Bay Meadows. Five days later, El Lobo took the Burlingame Handicap
El Lobo, a gelded son of stakes winning Boxthorn, continued to race and win through age 6. His highlights include winning the 1947 San Antonio and Hollywood Premiere Handicaps. In November 1950, the nine-year-old was tragically stuck by a car and killed
Featherfoot, who was two when she made the flight, was another offspring of Boxthorn

October 22, 1945

Equine history was in progress as El Lobo and Featherfoot became the very first Thoroughbreds to be transported by airplane. In a twin-engine Budd transport plane, the pair left from Los Angeles and landed safely in the parking area at Bay Meadows. Five days later, El Lobo took the Burlingame Handicap

El Lobo, a gelded son of stakes winning Boxthorn, continued to race and win through age 6. His highlights include winning the 1947 San Antonio and Hollywood Premiere Handicaps. In November 1950, the nine-year-old was tragically stuck by a car and killed

Featherfoot, who was two when she made the flight, was another offspring of Boxthorn