February262014
Dream Team ‘86
Ferdinand, trainer Charlie Whittingham, and jockey Bill Shoemaker

Dream Team ‘86

Ferdinand, trainer Charlie Whittingham, and jockey Bill Shoemaker

February82014

“DETERMINE WITH THE ROSES 
Determine, with jockey Ray York up, stands in the winner’s circle at Churchill Downs after winning the 80th running of the Kentucky Derby. Owner Andrew J Crevolin…is at right holding bridle”

Photo and caption from The Day - May 3, 1954

DETERMINE WITH THE ROSES 

Determine, with jockey Ray York up, stands in the winner’s circle at Churchill Downs after winning the 80th running of the Kentucky Derby. Owner Andrew J Crevolin…is at right holding bridle”


Photo and caption from The Day - May 3, 1954

December192013
"Silent" Tom Smith-trained Jet Pilot wears the roses after winning the 1947 Kentucky Derby
The handsome chestnut con of *Blenheim II led wire-to-wire from the 13th post position. Among the horses he defeated was future Belmont winner Phalanx

"Silent" Tom Smith-trained Jet Pilot wears the roses after winning the 1947 Kentucky Derby

The handsome chestnut con of *Blenheim II led wire-to-wire from the 13th post position. Among the horses he defeated was future Belmont winner Phalanx

December152013
King of Churchill
After surviving a stumble and near fall in the stretch, Alysheba and jockey Chris McCarron wear the roses of the 1987 Kentucky Derby

King of Churchill

After surviving a stumble and near fall in the stretch, Alysheba and jockey Chris McCarron wear the roses of the 1987 Kentucky Derby

December102013

"The record shattering stretch run of Whirlaway, his blazing final quarter in 24 seconds flat, a rare study of the little chestnut colt with the long tail cracking the 10-year-old Derby time of Twenty Grand by 2/5 of a second.”

November162013
The “Puerto Rican Rolls Royce” Bold Forbes flashes under the wire ahead of champion juvenile colt Honest Pleasure to win the 1976 Kentucky Derby 

The “Puerto Rican Rolls Royce” Bold Forbes flashes under the wire ahead of champion juvenile colt Honest Pleasure to win the 1976 Kentucky Derby 

October62013

“Bally Ache grazes contentedly at Churchill Downs with little apparent concern over Saturday’s running of the Kentucky Derby. The son of Bally Dam and Celestial Blue, champion three-year-old of Florida this past season, won the Stepping Stone at Churchill last Saturday and established himself as one of the strongest candidates for the Run for the Roses”

Photo and caption from The Miami News - May 3, 1960

Bally Ache grazes contentedly at Churchill Downs with little apparent concern over Saturday’s running of the Kentucky Derby. The son of Bally Dam and Celestial Blue, champion three-year-old of Florida this past season, won the Stepping Stone at Churchill last Saturday and established himself as one of the strongest candidates for the Run for the Roses”


Photo and caption from The Miami News - May 3, 1960

September212013
A Controversial Winner
Broker’s Tip, born just a few months after the stock market crash, came into the 1933 Kentucky Derby winless and without much support. Though he was bred and owned by Col. E. R. Bradley, whose life mission seemed to be to win as many Kentucky Derbies as possible, Broker’s Tip was seen as his weakest entry in years. All the attention was focused on lukewarm favorites Ladysman and Pomponious, with the rest of the field dismissed. The real stars, however, would soon turn out to be the maiden Broker’s Tip and the “ill-tempered” Head Play
Head Play, showing the stubborn streak of his uncle Man o’ War, refused to load into the starting gate and was allowed to start from outside of it. He bounded along quickly enough to claim the lead after six furlongs. Broker’s Tip, on the other hand, stayed well back in the pack, leading only one other horse through most of the race. Due to the heavy mud, Head Play was kept about 10 feet off the inside rail, a plan that backfired when the late-running Broker’s Tip came roaring through the gap in the stretch. It was then that racing history was made, as Head Play’s jockey steered him inside, towards his rival, hoping to block him off. The “Fighting Finish Derby” had begun.
In desperate bids to win the race, the jockeys grabbed each other’s saddlecloths, bridles, and legs. They used their whips on each other instead of the horses. They tried to drag each other out of the saddle or knock the other horse off course. Neither could cheat their way to a clear edge, with Head Play and Broker’s Tip sweeping under the wire seemingly as one
To their dying day, both jockeys claimed to have won the race. Both also committed enough fouls to have been disqualified. As it stands, Broker’s Tip was declared the winner by the judges, a group of four men who were watching the race through binoculars from the top of the grandstand. Bitter Head Play fans, including his jockey, claimed that the judges were afraid to offend the powerful Col. Bradley by deciding against his horse. They also pointed out that in close finishes, it almost always looks like the inside horse has won, even if they hadn’t
Broker’s Tip never won another race. To this day, he remains the only horse in history to have his sole career win come in the Kentucky Derby. Head Play, meanwhile, went on to clear victories in the Preakness Stakes, Suburban Handicap, and San Antonio Handicap

A Controversial Winner

Broker’s Tip, born just a few months after the stock market crash, came into the 1933 Kentucky Derby winless and without much support. Though he was bred and owned by Col. E. R. Bradley, whose life mission seemed to be to win as many Kentucky Derbies as possible, Broker’s Tip was seen as his weakest entry in years. All the attention was focused on lukewarm favorites Ladysman and Pomponious, with the rest of the field dismissed. The real stars, however, would soon turn out to be the maiden Broker’s Tip and the “ill-tempered” Head Play

Head Play, showing the stubborn streak of his uncle Man o’ War, refused to load into the starting gate and was allowed to start from outside of it. He bounded along quickly enough to claim the lead after six furlongs. Broker’s Tip, on the other hand, stayed well back in the pack, leading only one other horse through most of the race. Due to the heavy mud, Head Play was kept about 10 feet off the inside rail, a plan that backfired when the late-running Broker’s Tip came roaring through the gap in the stretch. It was then that racing history was made, as Head Play’s jockey steered him inside, towards his rival, hoping to block him off. The “Fighting Finish Derby” had begun.

In desperate bids to win the race, the jockeys grabbed each other’s saddlecloths, bridles, and legs. They used their whips on each other instead of the horses. They tried to drag each other out of the saddle or knock the other horse off course. Neither could cheat their way to a clear edge, with Head Play and Broker’s Tip sweeping under the wire seemingly as one

To their dying day, both jockeys claimed to have won the race. Both also committed enough fouls to have been disqualified. As it stands, Broker’s Tip was declared the winner by the judges, a group of four men who were watching the race through binoculars from the top of the grandstand. Bitter Head Play fans, including his jockey, claimed that the judges were afraid to offend the powerful Col. Bradley by deciding against his horse. They also pointed out that in close finishes, it almost always looks like the inside horse has won, even if they hadn’t

Broker’s Tip never won another race. To this day, he remains the only horse in history to have his sole career win come in the Kentucky Derby. Head Play, meanwhile, went on to clear victories in the Preakness Stakes, Suburban Handicap, and San Antonio Handicap

4PM
1941 Flamingo Stakes and Bahamas Handicap winner Dispose parading during a morning workout for the Kentucky Derby
A son of legendary “Iron Horse” Discovery, Dispose inherited his father’s stamina. He raced for seven years, although his biggest wins came at three

1941 Flamingo Stakes and Bahamas Handicap winner Dispose parading during a morning workout for the Kentucky Derby

A son of legendary “Iron Horse” Discovery, Dispose inherited his father’s stamina. He raced for seven years, although his biggest wins came at three

3PM
Speedy Kentucky Derby hopeful The Scoundrel goes for a morning workout at Churchill Downs in 1964
It was at once such workout at Santa Anita that this son of Italian stallion Toulouse Lautrec tied the track record for a mile

Speedy Kentucky Derby hopeful The Scoundrel goes for a morning workout at Churchill Downs in 1964

It was at once such workout at Santa Anita that this son of Italian stallion Toulouse Lautrec tied the track record for a mile

July292013
July282013
July262013
In front of a record crowd, Cannonade leaves behind 21 rivals to win the 1974 Kentucky Derby by about 2 3/4 lengths

In front of a record crowd, Cannonade leaves behind 21 rivals to win the 1974 Kentucky Derby by about 2 3/4 lengths

July192013

“Lawrin, owned by Herbert  M Woolf, is shown…driving toward the finish line to capture the 64th running of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs Saturday. A length behind is William Du Pon Jr’s Dauber, which placed second”

Photo and caption from The Montreal Gazette - May 9, 1938

Lawrin, owned by Herbert  M Woolf, is shown…driving toward the finish line to capture the 64th running of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs Saturday. A length behind is William Du Pon Jr’s Dauber, which placed second”


Photo and caption from The Montreal Gazette - May 9, 1938

July182013

“TO THE VICTORS, VENETIAN WAY AND BILL HARTACK
At left is owner Isaac Blumberg with trainer V. J. Sovinski”

Photo and caption from Toledo Blade - May 8, 1960

TO THE VICTORS, VENETIAN WAY AND BILL HARTACK

At left is owner Isaac Blumberg with trainer V. J. Sovinski”


Photo and caption from Toledo Blade - May 8, 1960

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