April182014

"He coupled that speed of a Thoroughbred with the heart of a lion."

Gallant Fox speeds to victory in the 1930 Kentucky Derby, with Gallant Knight in pursuit 

"He coupled that speed of a Thoroughbred with the heart of a lion."

Gallant Fox speeds to victory in the 1930 Kentucky Derby, with Gallant Knight in pursuit 

April132014

So I’ve been experimenting with stupid collages when I’m bored and have no internet

My favorites so far: Gallant Fox, Omaha, War Admiral, Whirlaway, Native Dancer, Assault, and Citation

January272014
Gallant Fox: The Fox of Belair, the Blazin’ Bay, the Wall-Eyed Wonder

Gallant Fox: The Fox of Belair, the Blazin’ Bay, the Wall-Eyed Wonder

January252014

"He had the so-called ‘look of eagles’ and one could note a very fine skeleton in spite of his well covered frame. His well shaped legs, their cleanness, his very deep and beautifully placed shoulder, and his fork were to me his outstanding points. He was a bit high-headed, but foals are high-headed when they are taking notice, and this particular characteristic of taking notice he has carried all through his life except when he really had to set down and run for it."

- Owner William Woodward’s first impressions of a young Gallant Fox

December82013
In the year that saw the brilliant Gallant Fox take the Triple Crown and his rival Whichone win a string of prominent races, there was another name which racing fans spoke of excitedly: Alcibiades
Alcidiabes was a homebred for owner/breeder Hal Price Headley. She was born on his Beaumont Farm in western Lexington, which was her home from birth to death. Her sire, minor stakes winner Supremus, traced back to Domino, while her dam was an imported British mare named Regal Roman. Contrary to popular belief, she was not named after prominent Athenian statesman and soldier Alcibiades, but rather after Hal Price Headley’s daughter Alice, who had been nicknamed that as a baby
Under the guidance of trainer Walter W Taylor, the stocky chestnut filly made her racing debut at two in 1929. She ran second to Desert Light in the Kentucky Jockey Club Stakes (prior to this, Desert Light had also defeated a still-green Gallant Fox in an allowance event). Alcibiades found her footing in the Clipsetta Stakes at Latonia Race Course (In 1929, the Clipsetta was run at six furlongs), winning in a quick time of 1:09 flat. It was at the venerable Churchill Downs that Alcibiades was boosted to national prominence with a victory in the prominent Debutante Stakes. As a result, she was named the Champion Juvenile Filly for the year
1930 was a historic year in racing, not least because of the exploits of Headley’s filly. She won only three races from her 16 starts at three, but the statistics don’t tell the whole story. Her standing and her owner’s confidence in her resulted in Alcibiades lining up for the 1930 Kentucky Derby. Preakness winner Gallant Fox was the favorite, and he showed why with a willful win over Gallant Knight. The filly, meanwhile, tired badly and finished 10th in the field of 15. At the end of the same month, the results were reversed in the Kentucky Oaks, which Alcibiades won by a length from favorited French-bred Galaday. In the nine furlong Illinois Oaks at Washington Park, she was beaten by Snowflake, the filly that many considered the better of the two (Snowflake, like Alcidiabes, had competed in one of the Triple Crown races, finishing third in the Preakness). The tables were turned once again when Alcibiades splashed to a muddy seven length victory in the Arlington Oaks, with Snowflake finishing a miserable seventh in the field of eight. In the media coverage of that event, Headley’s filly was referred to as “the pride of Kentucky”. She then ran third in the inaugural Arlington Matron Stakes, won by future champion handicap mare Valencienne, with four-year-old longshot Beaming Over in second. Exactly one week after that, Alcibiades was again upset, this time by Audley Farm’s Banner Bright in the Latonia Oaks. Given over a month’s rest after that, the game and gallant filly returned to the track on October 17 in the Hawthorne Gold Cup. Alcibiades was allowed to duel with speedy gelding Spinach in the early going, and was passed in the stretch by eventual winner Sun Beau (this was the second of Sun Beau’s record three Gold Cup wins) and runner-up Pigeon Hole. A scant two days after this, Alcibiades ran what turned out to be her final race. The Latonia Championship Stakes drew a field of only four entries, two males and two females. The favorite was Ontario Jockey Club Handicap winner Yarn, competing against the gelding Spinach, Alcibiades, and another filly called Star Lassie. From the start, Alcibiades set the pace. At the end of the first mile, Spinach ranged up alongside her, followed by Yarn. Inexplicably, the chestnut filly suddenly seemed to quit. She fell well back, allowing Spinach to go to victory by three lengths over Yarn, with Star Lassie third. It was later discovered that Alcibiades had torn a tendon during the race, and she was subsequently retired from racing. Her victories and close finishes earned her another championship title, although one that she shared with former rival Snowflake
Brilliant though she was on the track, Alcibiades really shined as a broodmare. Returned to the place of her birth, she lived in grand style for the next 27 years, until her death at age 30 in 1957. In all those years, she produced only seven foals, a result of some breeding problems (she was barren for eight of those years and miscarried two others). However, though they numbered few, her surviving offspring were almost entirely high quality. 
For her first mating, Headley selected 1921 Champion Handicap Male Mad Hatter (ironically, Mad Hatter was also the sire of Alcibiades’ rival Snowflake). The result of that was a chestnut gelding named Best Butter, one of the least successful of her offspring. He won 9 races from 57 starts and earned just over $2,000
Next, Headley decided that Alcibiades might fare better with a foreign-bred stallion, so he chose Harry Payne Whitney’s imported British stallion St Germans, who had already sired 1931 Kentucky Derby/Belmont Stakes winner and Horse of the Year Twenty Grand. Though falling short of Twenty Grand, the resulting filly, called Sparta, lived up to her mother with a win in the 1936 Latonia Oaks, before running second to Myrtlewood in the Ashland Stakes. From Sparta’s line came two-time California-bred Horse of the Year Free House
Pleased with the result of the St Germans mating, Headley’s next selection would have magnificent results. Back in 1929, he had thrown down $50,000 and walked away with a four-year-old British stakes-winning stallion named Pharamond II. Despite only minor stakes victories, Pharamond’s pedigree and good looks intrigued Headley. The purchase payed off big time. Three of Alcibiades’ best offspring were sired by Pharamond (in addition to the two miscarried fillies). The first of the foals produced from these two was the colt Agathon, born in 1934. With only one victory on the track and very scant produce, Agathon was a less than auspicious way to begin 
But Headley believed in the pairing, and Alcibiades was again bred to Pharamond. In 1935, she delivered a bay colt, probably her greatest contribution to racing. Menow, as he was named, ran to a championship title at two, with wins in the Champagne and Futurity Stakes. He won the Withers and Massachusetts Handicap at three, before bowed tendons forced his retirement. Like his mother, he became even greater at stud. Among his progeny were Hall of Famer Tom Fool, 1949 Preakness/Belmont winner and Co-Horse of the Year Capot, and 1942 Champion Juvenile Filly Askmenow
In 1936, Headley jumped when he was offered the chance to breed Alcibiades to Kentucky’s most famous stallion, Man o’ War. The resulting foal was the filly Salaminia, who won the 1940 Alabama Stakes, Ladies Handicap, and (ironically enough) Gallant Fox Handicap. And, as they had come to expect from Alcibiades’ babies, was an excellent producer. Her daughter Athenia, a fellow Ladies Handicap winner, was the granddam of 1968 GB/IRE Horse of the Year and Epsom Derby winner Sir Ivor
After several years barren, Alcibiades conceived again in 1943. Another Pharamond baby, the filly Hipparete, was the result. From 15 starts, she won four races, none of them stakes. Once again, however, it was in the breeding shed that she truly made her name. She was the dam of multiple stakes winning filly Rash Statement, who won her stakes debut, fittingly enough, in the 1959 Alcibiades Stakes at Keeneland
Her final Pharamond foal was born in 1946. Lithe, who in fact outearned her older brother Menow on the track, was the winner of the 1948 Demoiselle Stakes, the 1949 Comely Handicap, the 1950 Beverly Handicap, and the 1951 Clang Handicap, as well as back-to-back runnings of the Arlington Matron Handicap. Unlike her siblings, Lithe was not a great broodmare. Her best offpsring was the stakes placed filly Supple
Another stretch of barren years followed, before the 22-year-old mare conceived for the final time in 1949. The stallion this time was imported Argentinean stakes winner Rico Monte. Knowing that it was his old mare’s final foal, Headley named the filly Last of All. She was sold, unraced, at the 1953 Keeneland November Sale for $23,000, Last of All proved disappointing as a broodmare, and she died at age 20 in 1970
In 1952, five years before her death, Alcibiades was honored with a seven furlong race at Keeneland. The Alcibiades Stakes, still run today, has been won by such names as Doubledogdare (1955), Leallah (1956), Moccasin (1965), L’Alezane (1977), Eliza (1992), and Silverbulletday (1998)

In the year that saw the brilliant Gallant Fox take the Triple Crown and his rival Whichone win a string of prominent races, there was another name which racing fans spoke of excitedly: Alcibiades

Alcidiabes was a homebred for owner/breeder Hal Price Headley. She was born on his Beaumont Farm in western Lexington, which was her home from birth to death. Her sire, minor stakes winner Supremus, traced back to Domino, while her dam was an imported British mare named Regal Roman. Contrary to popular belief, she was not named after prominent Athenian statesman and soldier Alcibiades, but rather after Hal Price Headley’s daughter Alice, who had been nicknamed that as a baby

Under the guidance of trainer Walter W Taylor, the stocky chestnut filly made her racing debut at two in 1929. She ran second to Desert Light in the Kentucky Jockey Club Stakes (prior to this, Desert Light had also defeated a still-green Gallant Fox in an allowance event). Alcibiades found her footing in the Clipsetta Stakes at Latonia Race Course (In 1929, the Clipsetta was run at six furlongs), winning in a quick time of 1:09 flat. It was at the venerable Churchill Downs that Alcibiades was boosted to national prominence with a victory in the prominent Debutante Stakes. As a result, she was named the Champion Juvenile Filly for the year

1930 was a historic year in racing, not least because of the exploits of Headley’s filly. She won only three races from her 16 starts at three, but the statistics don’t tell the whole story. Her standing and her owner’s confidence in her resulted in Alcibiades lining up for the 1930 Kentucky Derby. Preakness winner Gallant Fox was the favorite, and he showed why with a willful win over Gallant Knight. The filly, meanwhile, tired badly and finished 10th in the field of 15. At the end of the same month, the results were reversed in the Kentucky Oaks, which Alcibiades won by a length from favorited French-bred Galaday. In the nine furlong Illinois Oaks at Washington Park, she was beaten by Snowflake, the filly that many considered the better of the two (Snowflake, like Alcidiabes, had competed in one of the Triple Crown races, finishing third in the Preakness). The tables were turned once again when Alcibiades splashed to a muddy seven length victory in the Arlington Oaks, with Snowflake finishing a miserable seventh in the field of eight. In the media coverage of that event, Headley’s filly was referred to as “the pride of Kentucky”. She then ran third in the inaugural Arlington Matron Stakes, won by future champion handicap mare Valencienne, with four-year-old longshot Beaming Over in second. Exactly one week after that, Alcibiades was again upset, this time by Audley Farm’s Banner Bright in the Latonia Oaks. Given over a month’s rest after that, the game and gallant filly returned to the track on October 17 in the Hawthorne Gold Cup. Alcibiades was allowed to duel with speedy gelding Spinach in the early going, and was passed in the stretch by eventual winner Sun Beau (this was the second of Sun Beau’s record three Gold Cup wins) and runner-up Pigeon Hole. A scant two days after this, Alcibiades ran what turned out to be her final race. The Latonia Championship Stakes drew a field of only four entries, two males and two females. The favorite was Ontario Jockey Club Handicap winner Yarn, competing against the gelding Spinach, Alcibiades, and another filly called Star Lassie. From the start, Alcibiades set the pace. At the end of the first mile, Spinach ranged up alongside her, followed by Yarn. Inexplicably, the chestnut filly suddenly seemed to quit. She fell well back, allowing Spinach to go to victory by three lengths over Yarn, with Star Lassie third. It was later discovered that Alcibiades had torn a tendon during the race, and she was subsequently retired from racing. Her victories and close finishes earned her another championship title, although one that she shared with former rival Snowflake

Brilliant though she was on the track, Alcibiades really shined as a broodmare. Returned to the place of her birth, she lived in grand style for the next 27 years, until her death at age 30 in 1957. In all those years, she produced only seven foals, a result of some breeding problems (she was barren for eight of those years and miscarried two others). However, though they numbered few, her surviving offspring were almost entirely high quality. 

For her first mating, Headley selected 1921 Champion Handicap Male Mad Hatter (ironically, Mad Hatter was also the sire of Alcibiades’ rival Snowflake). The result of that was a chestnut gelding named Best Butter, one of the least successful of her offspring. He won 9 races from 57 starts and earned just over $2,000

Next, Headley decided that Alcibiades might fare better with a foreign-bred stallion, so he chose Harry Payne Whitney’s imported British stallion St Germans, who had already sired 1931 Kentucky Derby/Belmont Stakes winner and Horse of the Year Twenty Grand. Though falling short of Twenty Grand, the resulting filly, called Sparta, lived up to her mother with a win in the 1936 Latonia Oaks, before running second to Myrtlewood in the Ashland Stakes. From Sparta’s line came two-time California-bred Horse of the Year Free House

Pleased with the result of the St Germans mating, Headley’s next selection would have magnificent results. Back in 1929, he had thrown down $50,000 and walked away with a four-year-old British stakes-winning stallion named Pharamond II. Despite only minor stakes victories, Pharamond’s pedigree and good looks intrigued Headley. The purchase payed off big time. Three of Alcibiades’ best offspring were sired by Pharamond (in addition to the two miscarried fillies). The first of the foals produced from these two was the colt Agathon, born in 1934. With only one victory on the track and very scant produce, Agathon was a less than auspicious way to begin 

But Headley believed in the pairing, and Alcibiades was again bred to Pharamond. In 1935, she delivered a bay colt, probably her greatest contribution to racing. Menow, as he was named, ran to a championship title at two, with wins in the Champagne and Futurity Stakes. He won the Withers and Massachusetts Handicap at three, before bowed tendons forced his retirement. Like his mother, he became even greater at stud. Among his progeny were Hall of Famer Tom Fool, 1949 Preakness/Belmont winner and Co-Horse of the Year Capot, and 1942 Champion Juvenile Filly Askmenow

In 1936, Headley jumped when he was offered the chance to breed Alcibiades to Kentucky’s most famous stallion, Man o’ War. The resulting foal was the filly Salaminia, who won the 1940 Alabama Stakes, Ladies Handicap, and (ironically enough) Gallant Fox Handicap. And, as they had come to expect from Alcibiades’ babies, was an excellent producer. Her daughter Athenia, a fellow Ladies Handicap winner, was the granddam of 1968 GB/IRE Horse of the Year and Epsom Derby winner Sir Ivor

After several years barren, Alcibiades conceived again in 1943. Another Pharamond baby, the filly Hipparete, was the result. From 15 starts, she won four races, none of them stakes. Once again, however, it was in the breeding shed that she truly made her name. She was the dam of multiple stakes winning filly Rash Statement, who won her stakes debut, fittingly enough, in the 1959 Alcibiades Stakes at Keeneland

Her final Pharamond foal was born in 1946. Lithe, who in fact outearned her older brother Menow on the track, was the winner of the 1948 Demoiselle Stakes, the 1949 Comely Handicap, the 1950 Beverly Handicap, and the 1951 Clang Handicap, as well as back-to-back runnings of the Arlington Matron Handicap. Unlike her siblings, Lithe was not a great broodmare. Her best offpsring was the stakes placed filly Supple

Another stretch of barren years followed, before the 22-year-old mare conceived for the final time in 1949. The stallion this time was imported Argentinean stakes winner Rico Monte. Knowing that it was his old mare’s final foal, Headley named the filly Last of All. She was sold, unraced, at the 1953 Keeneland November Sale for $23,000, Last of All proved disappointing as a broodmare, and she died at age 20 in 1970

In 1952, five years before her death, Alcibiades was honored with a seven furlong race at Keeneland. The Alcibiades Stakes, still run today, has been won by such names as Doubledogdare (1955), Leallah (1956), Moccasin (1965), L’Alezane (1977), Eliza (1992), and Silverbulletday (1998)

November232013
"And when he was retired for all times after his bloodless triumph in the Jockey Club Gold Cup, he was more than a racehorse - he was an institution"
Newly retired champion Gallant Fox poses for the cameras before settling down at Claiborne Farm. There, he embarked on a stud career that saw him make history as the only Triple Crown winner to sire another (1935 winner Omaha), as well as becoming the youngest stallion to ever do so (at age four). Amongst his other progeny were 1936 Horse of the Year and Champion 3-Year-Old Colt Granville, Ascot Gold Cup winner Flares, 1935 Dixie Handicap and Narragansett Special winner Calumet Dick, and Merchants and Citizens Handicap winner Olympus

"And when he was retired for all times after his bloodless triumph in the Jockey Club Gold Cup, he was more than a racehorse - he was an institution"

Newly retired champion Gallant Fox poses for the cameras before settling down at Claiborne Farm. There, he embarked on a stud career that saw him make history as the only Triple Crown winner to sire another (1935 winner Omaha), as well as becoming the youngest stallion to ever do so (at age four). Amongst his other progeny were 1936 Horse of the Year and Champion 3-Year-Old Colt Granville, Ascot Gold Cup winner Flares, 1935 Dixie Handicap and Narragansett Special winner Calumet Dick, and Merchants and Citizens Handicap winner Olympus

October252013

"He will have…good ones to beat in the Derby, and there is no doubt the competition will be keen, but I am glad I have been given the mount on such a fine horse as Gallant Fox, for I believe he can win the Derby”

- jockey Earl Sande, as reported three days before the 1930 Kentucky Derby

"He will have…good ones to beat in the Derby, and there is no doubt the competition will be keen, but I am glad I have been given the mount on such a fine horse as Gallant Fox, for I believe he can win the Derby”

- jockey Earl Sande, as reported three days before the 1930 Kentucky Derby

July292013
3-year-old Gallant Fox returns victorious after defeating Crack Brigade by four lengths in the 1930 Wood Memorial at Jamaica Park
The Wood was the first start of 1930 for Gallant Fox, who reversed his rather unremarkable juvenile record to go nearly undefeated through the year. This race also marked the first time Gallant Fox was paired with jockey Earl Sande

3-year-old Gallant Fox returns victorious after defeating Crack Brigade by four lengths in the 1930 Wood Memorial at Jamaica Park

The Wood was the first start of 1930 for Gallant Fox, who reversed his rather unremarkable juvenile record to go nearly undefeated through the year. This race also marked the first time Gallant Fox was paired with jockey Earl Sande

July92013
"The Fox of Belair"
3-year-old Gallant Fox in 1930, the year he won the Triple Crown. In addition, he won the Dwyer Stakes, Classic Stakes, Jockey Club Gold Cup, Wood Memorial, Lawrence Realization, and Saratoga Cup. His only loss of 1930 occurred in the Travers Stakes, when he was upset in heavy slop by a mudder called Jim Dandy 

"The Fox of Belair"

3-year-old Gallant Fox in 1930, the year he won the Triple Crown. In addition, he won the Dwyer Stakes, Classic Stakes, Jockey Club Gold Cup, Wood Memorial, Lawrence Realization, and Saratoga Cup. His only loss of 1930 occurred in the Travers Stakes, when he was upset in heavy slop by a mudder called Jim Dandy 

June162013
During the opening stages of the 1938 Kentucky Derby, Wood Memorial winner Fighting Fox (#5) hugs the rail while dueling with former champion juvenile Menow (#10) for the early lead
Though he was a full brother to Triple Crown winner Gallant Fox, Fighting Fox could finish no better than 6th in the Derby. Menow, after drifting in the stretch, finished 4th behind surprise winner Lawrin

During the opening stages of the 1938 Kentucky Derby, Wood Memorial winner Fighting Fox (#5) hugs the rail while dueling with former champion juvenile Menow (#10) for the early lead

Though he was a full brother to Triple Crown winner Gallant Fox, Fighting Fox could finish no better than 6th in the Derby. Menow, after drifting in the stretch, finished 4th behind surprise winner Lawrin

June32013

“Gallant Fox, which galloped home ahead of the field in the rich Preakness Stakes and paid his backers in cold cash, also rules the betting for the Kentucky Derby today. He is such a prohibitive favorite that he goes to the post as an even money bet. Can he come through again and pay off his admirers, or will Crack Brigade, Tannery, or one of the other entrants make the Fox’s ticket worthless? In the layout above the artist has signed the Fox’s name to a $4 check drawn on the Kentucky Derby National Bank. Will it be good?”

Illustration and caption from The Pittsburgh Press - May 17, 1930

Gallant Fox, which galloped home ahead of the field in the rich Preakness Stakes and paid his backers in cold cash, also rules the betting for the Kentucky Derby today. He is such a prohibitive favorite that he goes to the post as an even money bet. Can he come through again and pay off his admirers, or will Crack Brigade, Tannery, or one of the other entrants make the Fox’s ticket worthless? In the layout above the artist has signed the Fox’s name to a $4 check drawn on the Kentucky Derby National Bank. Will it be good?”

Illustration and caption from The Pittsburgh Press - May 17, 1930

11PM

The Preakness will do Gallant Fox plenty of good, and he will be harder than ever to beat in the Derby. He went the mile and three-sixteenths in great fashion and hung it on a horse as good as Crack Brigade.

He will have that horse and other good ones to beat in the Derby, and there is no doubt the competition will be keen, but I am glad I have been given the mount on such a fine horse as Gallant Fox, for I believe he can win the Derby.

Jockey Earl Sande, commenting to friends after Gallant Fox's victory in the 1930 Preakness Stakes. As printed in The Pittsburgh Press - May 14, 1930
April262013

"5/22/30 Aqueduct  - Gallant Fox, winner of the Wood Memorial, the Preakness, and the Kentucky Derby, with Earl Sande, famous jockey who ride the horse in his three winning efforts, at the Aqueduct racetrack. Gallant Fox is now in training for the Withers Mile and the Belmont Stakes in which he will oppose Whichone, the crack two-year-old of last season”

"5/22/30 Aqueduct  - Gallant Fox, winner of the Wood Memorial, the Preakness, and the Kentucky Derby, with Earl Sande, famous jockey who ride the horse in his three winning efforts, at the Aqueduct racetrack. Gallant Fox is now in training for the Withers Mile and the Belmont Stakes in which he will oppose Whichone, the crack two-year-old of last season”

March212013

Video

Hi, I just found this very interesting footage about the past Triple Crown winners so I share it with you

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTaVnxOWZgc

Oh yeah I do love that video XD

Anyone with an extra 40 minutes should definitely check it out

March162013
Preakness Stakes winner Gallant Fox gets a wash down while preparing for the Kentucky Derby

Preakness Stakes winner Gallant Fox gets a wash down while preparing for the Kentucky Derby

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