October42014
7-year-old gelding Wise Dan made a definite statement about his Horse of the Year status with a gutsy win in the Gr 1 Shadwell Turf Mile at Keeneland earlier today 
The 2011 Shadwell Mile was the last race that Dan lost on the turf, and he faced good competition in this year’s revival. Speedy Silver Max, who won last year’s Mile over the Polytrack at Keeneland, was Dan’s main rival, but also in the field were Optimizer, second to Dan in the Bernard Baruch, and Seek Again, who set a track record at Saratoga in winning the Fourstardave earlier this year 
Despite the competition and a bad break, Wise Dan reeled in the field coming down the stretch and won by a length, going away. It was his 23rd career victory, and pushed his earnings past $7 million 
{Read more/photo credit: X}

7-year-old gelding Wise Dan made a definite statement about his Horse of the Year status with a gutsy win in the Gr 1 Shadwell Turf Mile at Keeneland earlier today 

The 2011 Shadwell Mile was the last race that Dan lost on the turf, and he faced good competition in this year’s revival. Speedy Silver Max, who won last year’s Mile over the Polytrack at Keeneland, was Dan’s main rival, but also in the field were Optimizer, second to Dan in the Bernard Baruch, and Seek Again, who set a track record at Saratoga in winning the Fourstardave earlier this year 

Despite the competition and a bad break, Wise Dan reeled in the field coming down the stretch and won by a length, going away. It was his 23rd career victory, and pushed his earnings past $7 million 

{Read more/photo credit: X}

October12014
11AM
startinggate:

#WiseDanWednesday

Any day is a good day for Da Man 

startinggate:

#WiseDanWednesday

Any day is a good day for Da Man 

(via lehomestretchh)

September292014

Rachel Alexandra and Calvin Borel by wendyu on Flickr.

"A magnificent victory, an exquisite filly, and a thrill to see!"

Rachel Alexandra and Calvin Borel by wendyu on Flickr.

"A magnificent victory, an exquisite filly, and a thrill to see!"

September282014
Buckpasser, 1966 Arlington Classic in world record time 

Buckpasser, 1966 Arlington Classic in world record time 

September272014
A Queenly FillyWhen Martin Anderson paid $92,000 for a bay daughter of *Princequillo-Spar Maid at the 1965 Keeneland Summer Sale, he was perhaps hoping she would turn out like Princequillo’s older daughter, the champion juvenile Quill. In keeping with the family, she given the name Quillo Queen, and if she didn’t quite make it to Quill’s level, she nevertheless made her name known The filly first appeared in headlines when she ran champion juvenile filly Regal Gleam to a photo finish in the 1966 Selima Stakes at Laurel. Quillo Queen “opened up a substantial lead in the stretch but tired from her earlier efforts” and gave up the lead in the final stride. Her strong showing impressed fans and experts alike, and she assigned 113 pounds on the year-end Experimental Free Handicap (just three pounds less than Regal Gleam)Quillo Queen kicked off her three-year-old season with almost identical back-to-back losses to the filly Woozem, a half-sister to stakes winners Run For Nurse and Gallant Romeo. In the Jasmine Stakes at Hialeah in mid-January, Woozem pulled away in the stretch to win by six lengths, but Quillo Queen beat Astarita Stakes winner Irish County and Regal Gleam to finish second. Less than a month later in the Mimosa Stakes, Woozem won by five, with Quillo Queen again second. She got back into the big-time races in the $68,000 Acorn Stakes on May 29, but there she came up against her most frequent rival, Furl Sail. Furl Sail was beginning her run at the Triple Tiara, and she won the Acorn easily by three lengths, but Quillo Queen was once again a determined second. It was the same song a little over a week later in the Mother Goose at Aqueduct. Furl Sail made it two steps to the Tiara with another “romping” three-length victory. Quillo Queen edged King Ranch’s Muse for second place.Furl Sail was all set to win her Triple Tiara in the 1967 Coaching Club American Oaks, but Quillo Queen was just as set to finally break into the winner’s circle. She was helped by a quick-footed filly named Sumtex, who engaged Furl Sail in an early speed duel that left the champion drained. With her main competition laboring in the stretch, Quillo Queen rocketed to the lead and kept going, scoring an “emphatic victory” by seven lengths. Furl Sail ended up fourth, behind Muse and Gardenia Stakes winner Pepperwood.Riding her wave of success, Quillo Queen won the $58,000 Monmouth Oaks on July 4. She was the overwhelming favorite for the race, and she didn’t disappoint. Covering the 1 1/8 miles in 1:52 1/5, Princequillo’s daughter rolled to an easy 3 1/2-length victory from future champion producer Secret Promise and Matron Stakes winner Swiss Cheese.Quillo Queen had more than re-payed her purchase price, winning over $200,000 before being retired. Anderson retained her as a broodmare. The high point of her broodmare career came when her son Au Point (sired by French-raced champion Lyphard) won the 1983 Dwyer Stakes Quillo Queen died in 1986, at the age of 22
A Queenly Filly

When Martin Anderson paid $92,000 for a bay daughter of *Princequillo-Spar Maid at the 1965 Keeneland Summer Sale, he was perhaps hoping she would turn out like Princequillo’s older daughter, the champion juvenile Quill. In keeping with the family, she given the name Quillo Queen, and if she didn’t quite make it to Quill’s level, she nevertheless made her name known 

The filly first appeared in headlines when she ran champion juvenile filly Regal Gleam to a photo finish in the 1966 Selima Stakes at Laurel. Quillo Queen “opened up a substantial lead in the stretch but tired from her earlier efforts” and gave up the lead in the final stride. Her strong showing impressed fans and experts alike, and she assigned 113 pounds on the year-end Experimental Free Handicap (just three pounds less than Regal Gleam)

Quillo Queen kicked off her three-year-old season with almost identical back-to-back losses to the filly Woozem, a half-sister to stakes winners Run For Nurse and Gallant Romeo. In the Jasmine Stakes at Hialeah in mid-January, Woozem pulled away in the stretch to win by six lengths, but Quillo Queen beat Astarita Stakes winner Irish County and Regal Gleam to finish second. Less than a month later in the Mimosa Stakes, Woozem won by five, with Quillo Queen again second. 

She got back into the big-time races in the $68,000 Acorn Stakes on May 29, but there she came up against her most frequent rival, Furl Sail. Furl Sail was beginning her run at the Triple Tiara, and she won the Acorn easily by three lengths, but Quillo Queen was once again a determined second. It was the same song a little over a week later in the Mother Goose at Aqueduct. Furl Sail made it two steps to the Tiara with another “romping” three-length victory. Quillo Queen edged King Ranch’s Muse for second place.

Furl Sail was all set to win her Triple Tiara in the 1967 Coaching Club American Oaks, but Quillo Queen was just as set to finally break into the winner’s circle. She was helped by a quick-footed filly named Sumtex, who engaged Furl Sail in an early speed duel that left the champion drained. With her main competition laboring in the stretch, Quillo Queen rocketed to the lead and kept going, scoring an “emphatic victory” by seven lengths. Furl Sail ended up fourth, behind Muse and Gardenia Stakes winner Pepperwood.

Riding her wave of success, Quillo Queen won the $58,000 Monmouth Oaks on July 4. She was the overwhelming favorite for the race, and she didn’t disappoint. Covering the 1 1/8 miles in 1:52 1/5, Princequillo’s daughter rolled to an easy 3 1/2-length victory from future champion producer Secret Promise and Matron Stakes winner Swiss Cheese.

Quillo Queen had more than re-payed her purchase price, winning over $200,000 before being retired. Anderson retained her as a broodmare. The high point of her broodmare career came when her son Au Point (sired by French-raced champion Lyphard) won the 1983 Dwyer Stakes 

Quillo Queen died in 1986, at the age of 22
11AM
afleetalexandra:

Two-year-old Alysheba in the post parade for the 1986 Breeder’s Cup Juvenile at Santa Anita. He finished third behind Champion Juvenile Colt Capote

afleetalexandra:

Two-year-old Alysheba in the post parade for the 1986 Breeder’s Cup Juvenile at Santa Anita. He finished third behind Champion Juvenile Colt Capote

11AM
afleetalexandra:

Alysheba 1987! by erikn71 on Flickr.
One of the best combos in racing: McCarron and Alysheba

My beautiful boys…

afleetalexandra:

Alysheba 1987! by erikn71 on Flickr.

One of the best combos in racing: McCarron and Alysheba

My beautiful boys…

11AM
jaggedhawk:

The cool things I discover on my daily #run. #Alysheba #horses #art #texas (at Lone Star Park)

Kay, now I definitely have to take a trip to Lone Star sometime soon…

jaggedhawk:

The cool things I discover on my daily #run. #Alysheba #horses #art #texas (at Lone Star Park)

Kay, now I definitely have to take a trip to Lone Star sometime soon…

September252014

"About the head of a truly great horse there is an air of freedom unconquerable. The eyes seem to look on heights beyond our gaze.  It is the look of a spirit that can soar. It is the birthright of eagles."

-John Taintor Foote, “The Look of Eagles”

5PM

afleetalexandra:

"He was the perfect example of an ugly duckling that turns into a swan with age. Like the skinny teenager that develops into a big strong athlete, some horses are just a little late in maturing"

4PM
afleetalexandra:

1989 Horse of the Year Sunday Silence makes his triumphant return to racing in the 1990 Californian Stakes
Facing only two opponents and sent off as the 1-9 favorite, Sunday Silence proved he was back in action with a willful 3/4 length win over veteran runner Stylish Winner. It was the last win of his career
Three weeks later, Sunday Silence came up short by a head to future Horse of the Year Criminal Type in the Hollywood Gold Cup. While in training for the Arlington Challenge Cup at Arlington International, it was discovered that he had torn a ligament in his left foreleg. In early August 1990, it was officially announced that he had been retired to stud 

afleetalexandra:

1989 Horse of the Year Sunday Silence makes his triumphant return to racing in the 1990 Californian Stakes

Facing only two opponents and sent off as the 1-9 favorite, Sunday Silence proved he was back in action with a willful 3/4 length win over veteran runner Stylish Winner. It was the last win of his career

Three weeks later, Sunday Silence came up short by a head to future Horse of the Year Criminal Type in the Hollywood Gold Cup. While in training for the Arlington Challenge Cup at Arlington International, it was discovered that he had torn a ligament in his left foreleg. In early August 1990, it was officially announced that he had been retired to stud 

4PM
afleetalexandra:


K: “Put that black bastard away. God, that’s an awful weanling.”
L: “Well, Mr Keefer, roses will look mighty pretty on him one day. You never know.”
K: “The only time that son of a bitch will ever have a rose on him will be on his grave.”

- Conversation between adviser Ted Keefer and Stone Farm manager Pete Logan, regarding the weanling Sunday Silence 

afleetalexandra:

K: “Put that black bastard away. God, that’s an awful weanling.”

L: “Well, Mr Keefer, roses will look mighty pretty on him one day. You never know.”

K: “The only time that son of a bitch will ever have a rose on him will be on his grave.”

- Conversation between adviser Ted Keefer and Stone Farm manager Pete Logan, regarding the weanling Sunday Silence 

3PM
Pukka Gin

"In the language of the Hindus, Pukka means the best…Just where the word "Gin" fits into the name…is difficult to figure."(The Evening Independent, March 15, 1944)

As with many unique racehorse names, the one bestowed on 1943 Champagne Stakes winner Pukka Gin inspired rumors and stories. The most popular version stated that owner and breeder C.V. Whitney had initially intended for the bay son of two-time Jockey Club Gold Cup winner Firethorn to be named Pukka Gen. However, through either bad handwriting or poor eyesight, the name was recorded as Pukka Gin, and Whitney decided to leave it that way. The name, and the horse that bore it, were discussed at great length over the winter of 1943-44, when he was the winter book favorite for the Kentucky Derby. This reputation rested largely on his victory in the Champagne Stakes, in which he defeated future Derby winner Pensive, future Champion 3-Year-Old colt Occupy, and Champion Juvenile colt Platter. Pukka Gin received the high weight of 126 pounds in the 1943 Experimental Free Handicap, two more than the acknowledged champion Platter. Sadly, Pukka Gin was not the same horse at three. Early in the year, he was still considered to have Derby promise. He “showed strength” while finishing “a fast closing second” in one division of the Experimental Handicap at Jamaica on April 13. But by the time of the Wood Memorial on April 23, he was “the disappointment of the two races” (the Wood Memorial being run in two divisions that year). He finished fourth in the second division, behind Greentree Stable’s Stir Up, who had become the new Derby favorite.

Pukka Gin

"In the language of the Hindus, Pukka means the best…Just where the word "Gin" fits into the name…is difficult to figure."
(The Evening Independent, March 15, 1944)


As with many unique racehorse names, the one bestowed on 1943 Champagne Stakes winner Pukka Gin inspired rumors and stories. The most popular version stated that owner and breeder C.V. Whitney had initially intended for the bay son of two-time Jockey Club Gold Cup winner Firethorn to be named Pukka Gen. However, through either bad handwriting or poor eyesight, the name was recorded as Pukka Gin, and Whitney decided to leave it that way. 

The name, and the horse that bore it, were discussed at great length over the winter of 1943-44, when he was the winter book favorite for the Kentucky Derby. This reputation rested largely on his victory in the Champagne Stakes, in which he defeated future Derby winner Pensive, future Champion 3-Year-Old colt Occupy, and Champion Juvenile colt Platter. Pukka Gin received the high weight of 126 pounds in the 1943 Experimental Free Handicap, two more than the acknowledged champion Platter. 

Sadly, Pukka Gin was not the same horse at three. Early in the year, he was still considered to have Derby promise. He “showed strength” while finishing “a fast closing second” in one division of the Experimental Handicap at Jamaica on April 13. But by the time of the Wood Memorial on April 23, he was “the disappointment of the two races” (the Wood Memorial being run in two divisions that year). He finished fourth in the second division, behind Greentree Stable’s Stir Up, who had become the new Derby favorite.

September242014

"But the major addition to the stud was made on the day when Citation, Coaltown, and Bewitch were loaded into the same car and sent back to Calumet Farm. Citation had his million, Bewitch had topped all the others of her sex in earnings, Coaltown was the swiftest horse of his time, and if he did not have the class of his great stablemate, he nevertheless had class.

'Do you suppose,' asked Jimmy Jones, 'that one car ever carried three such horses into retirement before?' It was a rather idle question. No other three horses of such quality had ever been together in the same stable.”

-Joe H. Palmer, American Race Horses (1951)

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